Need plumbing push on-off supply valve help

http://s1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb360/shelf1 /
The above pix shows a similar water supply valve under my kitchen sink, which driips near the crimp. I would like to replace the hose and crimp: is there a way to do this? Do I have to replace the entire valve assembly with hose by cutting the supply pipe closer to the wall? Can it be recrimped?
Assistance requested and appreciated. tia
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On Dec 1, 7:23 pm, shellyf snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

What's coming out of the wall, PVC?
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Good question. I've never seen a push/pull valve like that on a toilet before.
Before doing anything, exactly where is it leaking? Since she's concerned with the hose/crimp, sounds like it's leaking there. If so, first thing I'd try is to get a stainless steel hose clamp, take off the old clamp, and replace it. That might be all that is needed.
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On Fri, 2 Dec 2011 05:28:03 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

toile, throughout the house. It is leaking at the end of the crimp. The old clamp will not come off! Sumter County, FL: almost all homes have this same arrangement.
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On Thu, 1 Dec 2011 18:53:53 -0800 (PST), Mikepier

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On Thu, 01 Dec 2011 19:23:19 -0500, shellyf_DELETE snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Looks like this is the valve: http://www.accortechnology.com/flowtite.html
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On 12/2/2011 7:08 PM, shellyf_DELETE snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Shelly, I don't recognize the brand, but it looks like one of the newer push on fittings. Shark bite and other brands have a way to remove a fitting that didn't grab correctly.
See if this brand looks right. There is a tool for removing shown when you click on demounting: http://hep2o.wavin.com/Hep2o/Installation.html
It may be worth contacting a local plumber to ask what brand fittings are used and where they buy them.
--


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On Dec 2, 8:08 pm, shellyf snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Looks like you have a choice. Either convert to a conventional stop valve by gluing on an adaptor or get another one of the existing ones. How you get the existing widget off, I don't know. But if you can't there's enough pipe there so you could just cut it off.
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On 12/3/2011 7:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Great find. That sure looks like the right one. Removable and reusable. The literature does say that it can be removed by turning in counterclockwise.
Labor and material guaranteed for 10 years. Shelly should probably contact the company, she may have a plumber coming for free. May well be worth looking into.
--


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shellyf_DELETE snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It appears that the type of valve and supply hose that you have is a single unit, and the supply hose (with the crimp) is factory installed. That means that you cannot take off the hose or crimped part where you said it is leaking.
I found this link with some info on what you have: http://www.accortechnology.com/4ALLSpec_PVC.pdf
The valve itself is supposed to be removable (the supply hose would come off with the valve). Someone here wrote that the valve can be removed by turning it counterclockwise. I have not found that anywhere, but maybe that is correct.
Since you said that other homes in your area have the same thing, maybe they sell them in plumbing supply places or hardware stores in your area. You could also try calling the manufacturer to find out where you can buy them in your area. And, the manufacturer should be able to tell you how to release and remove the valve (and hose assembly) from the CPVC pipe.
If you shut off the water supply, then take the supply hose off where it connects to the sink, and then can remove the valve, you can bring the whole thing with you to buy a replacement assembly.
Or, if you cannot get the valve off (or can't find anywhere that tells you how to get it off), maybe you could just use a hacksaw or whatever to cut the CPVC pipe right below the valve and get the whole assembly off that way. And, if you cannot find a regular replacement for the whole assembly, just bring it all with you to a Home Depot, Lowes, a hardware store, or whatever and they'll be able to hook you up with what you need to do the replacement with more standard materials. They'll sell you a valve and a separate supply hose that screws onto the valve. You can either glue the new valve on to the remaining piece of CPVC pipe, or they may have a valve or adapter etc. that uses a push-on type of technology.
Good luck.
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Ron wrote:

P.S. Here's a link that shows how to contact the manufacturer:
http://www.accortechnology.com/contactUs.html .
I think they will be bale to tell you how to get the old one off, where to get a new one, and as someone else suggested, they may even be able to send a new one to you (maybe for free, maybe not).
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He should decide if the removal tool is worth the cost. And check to see if all the installed valves have clearance for the disengager. I can see where that could be a problem if the installer didn't account for that. Can't say whether that valve setup is a good idea. I have clip disengage tools for GM fuel injection lines, and those lines don't leak, and new clips are cheap if you break one. But as you say, he has the option of going different ways. Depends on cost/hassle factor.
--Vic
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shellyf_DELETE snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote the following:

The valve and supply line is a single unit. The text below is from http://www.floorstransformed.com/uploadedfiles/ceramic-tile-forum/2005/removing-a-flowtite-valve-18548.html
1. Shut off your house water at the mainline.
2. Disconnect the nut end of the connector first. This is the chrome nut that attaches to the faucet (me = or toilet tank). It should only be hand tight, but some installers will wrench them on. A 6 or 8 inch adjustable wrench will work fine. For the toilet it's the large white plastic nut connected to the toilet tank.
3. Rotate the valve on the pipe counter-clockwise with a slight pull while turning.
4. After about 6 or 8 twists, the valve should turn itself completely off of the pipe.
5. When the valve is removed, you'll see about a half inch of the pipe tip will have these spiral scars. They look almost like a fine pipe thread. They're not. They're caused by the gripping teeth inside the valve when the valve is rotated. This is the important part. When you go to re-install your valves (they are re-usable if there is no damage to the O-ring inside), cut-away the scarred portion of the pipe. If you can't, then just smooth the pipe surface with emery cloth or a fine sand paper before re-installing your valve.
6. Push the valve back onto the pipe with a slight turn of the wrist a full 1 and one-quarter inches. It works well to measure and mark the pipe. Try and avoid "screwing" the valve onto the pipe. Just push it on with a slight turn of the wrist to the 1-1/4" mark.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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one are guaranteed for 10 years. House is 5 years young. I will remove the old one by twisting ccw a quarter turn and pulling it off. I will sand down any 'spiral marks' on the cpvc pipe I will replace by pushing on and turning cw until it reaches a predetermined distance. Accortechnology has been extremely cooperative thus far.
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shellyf_DELETE snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Wow, that is so cool! Thanks for letting us know how it worked out.
I, for one, learned a few things here. One was about those types of valves (which I had never seen before) and how they work. And another was that AccorTechnology honors their warranty and does the right thing in dealing with their customers and the consumer/end-user.
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