Need help with grounding rod, please.

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On 7/12/2012 8:06 PM, gregz wrote:

I knew an older fella that installed radio and tv antennas and maybe even c-band satellites that all needed grounding rods.
He told me once about 15 years ago he always used water to soften the ground then push the grounding rod (usually galvanized piping) into the soft spot. I thought it strange then.
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On 7/12/2012 7:06 PM, gregz wrote:

ya, that might work on the beach. Not in dirt or clay.
--
Steve Barker
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I am not sure what kind of dirt that we have in the middle of North Carolina, but I was told of the same way to sink a gound rod. I have put down 3 rods at my house in "dirt" and they went in fine. Dig a hole about 2 or 3 inches deep and acouple of inches in diameter, fill with water. Then by hand start pushing and pulling on the rod. YOu may need to add water as the rod goes down. When the rod is a couple of feet in, pull it out and fill the hole with water. Put the rod in and repeat. Soon the 8 foot rod is all the way in. I did use a pair of vicegrips to get a beter hold on the rod.
Part time electrician friend of mine has used this method many times.
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On 7/12/2012 8:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I guess most of the responders have never set up an electric fence.
The only problem you may have is getting a good metallic connection between the rebar and your ground wire. You can do this by grinding the rust off a bit of the rebar and using a ground wire clamp from your local hardware store. Smear with grease before clamping the wire.
If you soil is damp, you don't need to drive the rebar in very far. If dry soil, then drive it as far as possible. The 5,000 to 10,000 volt pulse will pass right through the damp rust, or even the dry rust.
Get an electric fence tester and check for voltage at several places along the fence. My tester is a plastic box with several neon bulbs that flash for different electric fence voltages. A wire has a stainless steel wand about 3 inches long to press into the soil, then touch the fence wire with a probe on the tester. Other testers may be different.
If you can't drive the rod due to rocks, burying it is also fine.
I live in the Central Oregon desert and the previous owner fastened wire to rebar and buried it for the fence ground. I moved to a different location and was able drive a rod for 2-3 feet.
Good luck. Paul
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On 7/12/2012 10:39 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

for electric fence, as long as you get a good connection attaching the conductor to the rebar, just drive it in the ground. It'll be good.
--
Steve Barker
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On Thu, 12 Jul 2012 08:39:14 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

I farm and have electric fences. Rebar is not very good, and 3 ft. is too short. The copper clad rods made for electric grounds is the best, but 1/2 or 3/4" galvanized pipe will work in a pinch. But go at least 5 feet long. Leave 3 or 4" sticking out of the ground for the clamp, pound in the rest of it. 6 feet is better, 8 is approved for code of electrical systems, but there is no code for electric fences.
Here's a hard learned tip. Soem years ago I had a piece of 1/2" EMT conduit about 30" long and pounded that in. It was only meant to be temporary. But it remained for a few years. Well, we got a dry spell, the soil cracked, and soon I had loose horses. They were not getting jolted, yet the fence was turned on and not shorted. I tested the fence and re-tested it, and re-checked it, and everything was good. The controller showed a good 5kv on my tester across the terminals. I finally thought I better check the ground to be sure the wire was well clamped to the pipe. I touched that ground rod and was knocked right on my ass. The jolt was 5 times stronger than just touching the fence when live. It turned out that the soil was so dry that the ground was not working any more.
I wet the soil around the ground rod and the fence worked again. That's when I bought a 6ft, copper clad ground rod and never had a problem since. EMT couduit was poor to begin, then the soil was dry probably all the way to the bottom of that pipe. At 6 feet down, the soil is not likely to dry out completely.
Note, in sandy areas, you may need more than one rod, spaced at least 10ft. apart and wired together with #8 or #6 solid copper wire.
One last note. In a drought, the soil is so dry that the animals hooves are not making a good ground. We are currently having this problem. I touched the fence myself and barely got a tingle, and I was only wearing tennis shoes. I did some hosing of the ground near the places the animals like to lean over the fence to get some of that "greener grass".
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On Jul 13, 5:44am, snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote:

Interesting. Around here soil that dry is unimaginable...well, okay, I can imagine it, but it's unbelievable...well.... ;)
Glad you didn't have some of your openings welded shut with that jolt.
R
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On 7/13/2012 8:16 AM, RicodJour wrote:
...

...
As noted above, unfortunately we're quite familiar w/ the problem and the symptoms...and we're about there again this year after last year being nearly as bad as any of the "Dirty-30s" years.
We've had no winter wheat pasture last two years owing to the extremely dry conditions but normally we run up to 2000 heifers over winter w/ single-strand electric fences. Typically build up to 20 miles every fall and take up in spring when bring 'em in off the wheat for either sale or into feedlot at the house.
Consequently I have a _lot_ of experience w/ electric fences... :) When roughly jr-high age the proper wire height was just about hip-bone on me so stepping over a fence meant had to be between posts where was a little wire sag and being careful. Obviously, best intentions of such ilk always have a little uncertainty in the outcome and getting zapped often enough gave me an unliking for anything much to do w/ electricity and still colored my classes selection when got to uni to avoid the electric labs as much as possible in lieu of nuc and/or chemical instead... :) (Was NE major w/ ChE minor; 30+ yr in utilities' support/r&d eng'g before coming back to farm after dad died almost 12 yr ago now...)
--
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wrote:

We're having that type of drought right now. Fortunately we got about 1/4" of rain today. First time in nearly a month. I have a willow tree that is dying, I started watering it this week to hopefully save it. It's so dry that when I tried to mow the lawn, it created so much dust I had to stop. The lawn is not growing, I only mowed because I was too busy earlier in the season to do it around the out buildings, and it was knee high by the barn. But the dust was so bad it clogged the air cleaner on the mower. I had to use the air compressor to blow out the dust. I just stopped after mowing a walkway. It's better to leave it intact so the soil will hold a little more moisture.
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snipped-for-privacy@thecave.com wrote: .

I heard on TV that it's so dry in the Southwest, the Attorney General is smuggling water pistols!
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http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
Two yrs ago, CO and KS were 90% "exceptional drought". Even during the vicious flooding in upper central CO, this year, that one little spot down in SE CO remained severly drought stricken. Squirt guns, indeed. ;)
nb
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On 11/28/2013 10:18 AM, notbob wrote:

Even though central/eastern KS got record accumulations thru August this year when it did begin the High Plains areas are still, while not quite as bad as a year ago, in serious hurt...we're in that corner of D3 in SW KS that is out of D4 but just barely...
--


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