>> Need advice for building a half-wall with countertop

Hello everyone. Recently I had a posting on here about building a temporary wall. Thank you everyone for your suggestions. I am finding out what I really need is called a "half-wall" with a counter top. Basically identical to that is seen in the picture I have included (
http://images.scrippsweb.com/DIY/2003/09/18/wkr105_1cc_e.jpg ). I have no idea how to even begin. I also have hardwood floors so I would like it if I can install this without really damaging them in case I want to remove the wall at some later date. Thank you very very much for your help. I am a newbie at home improvement and I am being told this is a very easy job. Thank you.
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The most difficult part here is making the wall strong enough so it doesn't wiggle. Normally such a wall would be anchored below the floor, with at least the end being bolted to floor joists, if not more. Other than that, it would be built much like a standard wall with studs 16" on center, and a top and bottom plate. Double top plate and maybe 2x6 rather than 2x4 might add some strength.

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mwlogs wrote:

Yeah, that's a problem if the idea is to make it essentially non-permanent...it'll be difficult to attach it and support it w/o a solid tie-in to the floor. And a solid tie will be hard to achieve w/o damaging the floor at least in a couple of spots.
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Maybe really strong magnets?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

You'll have better luck searching if you use the term knee wall.
You will want to build the wall with 2x6 framing - it will be more stable than with 2x4s. Can you build a return wall (short wall @ 90 degrees forming a corner) under the countertop? If so you won't need to do a lot to stabilize the wall. A couple of deck screws every 12" will be all you'll need to keep it from moving around.
If not, do you have access from below? If so you can use drill holes through the floor and bolt the wall with threaded rod (longer rod is better) and blocking between the floor joists. The drilled hole doesn't really present a problem if you want to lose the wall later. A round plug with grain oriented to match the flooring will fill the hole and can be touched up to be hardly noticeable.
Covering one or both sides with glued and screwed plywood will add a lot of stiffness.
R
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<Snip>

No - half wall is correct.
knee wall is under an eave supporting a roof.
Proper definition knee wall (1) A wall that shortens the span of the roof rafters by acting as a knee brace, in that it supports the rafters at some intermediate point along their length. (2) A short wall con-structed to extend the height of an ex-isting foundation or other wall system
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replying to RicodJour, Robert Lang wrote:

Drilled hole needs plugs, but are easy to fix. Nail holes can be filled and refinished with little work. But why temporary? Get it right, do it once. Make a model out of cardboard and live with that for a week and see if it is good.
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I would not make it a temporary wall. Anything you build is removable. You WILL need to do some damage to your wood floor to do what you want w/o a wiggle.
This article may be useful http://www.thecitizennews.com/main/archive-050504/hg-10_easy.html

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If you build a simple 2x4 wall and screw it to the floor, I'm betting it'll fall over the first time someone leans on it.
You can strengthen the wall by fastening one end to a stud in an adjoining wall. But the free end will still swing around.
If you can add an "L" to the end and fasten this to the floor, you'll gain a lot of stability.
Increasing the thickness of the wall can help. For example, build the wall with 2x6's or 2x8's and screw the base to the floor on the outside edges. This will give you a little extra leverage. But, you'll probably need to cover one or both sides with plywood to keep the studs from simply pulling away from the base. Also, be sure you are screwing down through the floor and into the floor joists below. Screwing into the wood flooring won't be strong enough.
If you have enough room, you could install a narrow cabinet instead of a wall, and put the counter on top. You'll gain a little extra storage in the process.
In fact, you could even put casters on the bottom of the cabinets and hide them behind baseboard trim. You wouldn't have to make any attachment to the floor, and could move the wall around when needed. A local chinese restaurant uses walls like these, and they seem to work well.
Anthony
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enough to be stable and you can store items in them. Later when you no longer need the wall you can use them for something else.
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On 24 May 2005 12:48:26 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Why don't you just order some partitions from an office supply catalog?
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Hey everyone. Perhaps I will build it in an L -shape. That would be neat. Anyway, I am still looking for how to do it. Is there an online guide or book? When I say I know nothing about home improvement, I really know nothing. It someone said "go by some drywall, I wouldn't even know what to look for. I know it sounds stupid, but I am willing to learn. Thanks again for an advice!
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