Name of tool to remove broken pvc pipe in fitting

I understand there is a tool that "drills" out broken pieces of pvc pipe from fittings. I was trying to search for one on the web, but I need a name for the tool. Otherwise I am finding nothing.
Mark
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I would just remove the fitting....replace it and go on. Ive never heard of a tool that will accurately drill out pieces of old pvc pipe from a fitting....It would be expensive as it would have to be able to remove the pipe pieces without scaring the inside wall/mating surface of the fitting
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They make one for DWV, or at least they used to. I haven't seen one in years. It makes a sloppy hole, but since DWV does not need to hold pressure, it works OK. It is used for removing pipe from a fitting encased in concrete. It takes a long time for the new joint to set up because of the sloppy fit.
Never saw one for pressure pipe.
Stretch
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Stretch wrote:

Around here they pressure test the DWV by filling the lines until it flows out the roof vent. Any weak link in the chain...
R
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On 12 Dec 2005 03:22:37 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I should have specified the situation. It's an electrical PCV pipe. It comes out of the ground to a plastic outdoor box. Then more pipe extends up the pole to another fixture. It snapped off on the top of the box. Yes, I could rip the whole thing out, but with the ground being frozen and the pipe right against the pole, I could risk breaking the pipe at ground level and only make matters worse. Cold pvc is real stiff and thats probably why it snapped off. Anyhow, there is no water pressure, I just need to cleanout the busted stub and glue in a new piece of pipe. If the hole is sloppy, a little epoxy will fill the gap and prevent any rain from getting in.
I have never heard of a tool for electrical pvc pipe, but have for plumbing. The pipe itself is pretty much the same thing.
I know one thing, I will not use those pvc boxes again. From now on I will use the old metal ones and just glue threaded ends on the PVC pipe. At least there is something that can be unscrewed.
I am considering using a dreml tool with a small grinder, but would still like to find out what those tools are called.
Mark
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Pasco makes one. Here is a source: http://www.plumbingsupply.com/pvcsaver.html
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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There we go. Thats the thing....
Thank You !!!!!!
Mark
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Errr hacksaw?
I have seen tool (really a try a saw bit for a drill)
I bought one off of ebay to make a pvc pipe recessed enough for a toilet flange. Its basically a little saw blade attached to a metal pipe and that goes into a drill. fire up the drill and your sawing happily into the pipe where no hacksaw can go.
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I had a tool like that for repairing sprinkler systems. It was very much like an "Easy-Out" screw remover, but larger to fit the plastic pipes and with a longer, T-shaped handle.
The sprinklers I was working on had 3/4 plastic pipe with a Tee adapter whereever you wanted a sprinkler head. The Tee adapter had 3/4 glue-on couplings on each side and a 1/2 screw connector on the side. You then screwed a 1/2 nipple into the screw connector. These nipples tended to get broken by lawn mowers, and the remover tool allowed them to be removed without damageing the tee.
--
Rich Greenberg Marietta, GA, USA richgr atsign panix.com + 1 770 321 6507
Eastern time. N6LRT I speak for myself & my dogs only. VM\'er since CP-67
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 16:15:35 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Rich Greenberg) wrote:

Yes, I have seen those, but they are for threaded pvc pipes. To remove the threaded in stub.
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Check out Wheeler/Rex. I just bought a 2" from them that saved me a big re-pipe on a commercial pool job.

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Wow, I didn't know they made several varieties of these. Now to figure out which work the best and are not too costly.
Thank You
Mark
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 21:04:00 -0700, "Casino Knight"

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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 03:02:05 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Wouldn't it be easier to just cut the whole side-wall off another box and glue it on the existing box after chopping out the screwed up nipple?
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replying to maradcliff, David N wrote: I was just googling for the same thing and found a few that don't look terribly expensive. $10-25. https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=tool+for+removing+old+pvc
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That was 11 years ago, I hope he has fixed things by now.........
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