Nail placement in 3 tab seal tab shingles?


Ok I have read the directions on my Owens-Corning shingles. However when I started to remove the existing old shingles I see they were nailed in the tar seal strip. Now I am not sure if back 27 years ago the installer had used nail guns. But the shingles are dried and very bad but still I have no leaks. Aside from the warranty being voided isn't this a good place to put the nail for the following reasons? 1. The tar will seal around the nail shaft and the head after the sun has done it's thing. 2. The sealing might stop the nail from popping up in the future. 3. The nail is a bit farther up from the above courses tab's lower edge. I am amazed that the nail is so close to the edge of the overlap anyway when installed via the directions. I would think if anything that the nail should go above the tar seal strip. That way any water that might be pulled up under the shingle by capillary action would be stopped by the seal of the two shingles before reaching the nail. What do you think?
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installation as does the manufacturer. I do agree that it is nice to know why when there is something I do not understand. I am sure that the nailing recommendations are based on leak and blow-off testing of different nailing methods.
Don Young
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8" exposure.....OKaaaaaay.
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Ok, so Certainteed's carriage house aren't as standard as I thought. If you're using a wimpy-ass timberline shingle that's only 12" deep, then the exposure is 5".
Which still gives you a 2" stripe to hit on the underlying shingle.
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And figuring that nailing anywhere in the 2" strip is 'good enough' voids the warantee.
Harry K
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DJW wrote:

Think about what? If the manufacturer is correct?
The fact that your 27 yr old shingles were nailed differently than NEW Owens are, is totally irrelevant to each other. Who was the old manufacturer, and what was the nailing placement recommendation?
Your thoughts sound like something my ex-brother-in law would come up with. Is your name Gary? If so, when did they release you?
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Follow direction on the package for the shingle you bought. Even for the same mfgr, different directions based on product.
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Correct. If he varies from what the bundle says, any warrantee is void.
Harry K
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| Ok I have read the directions on my Owens-Corning shingles. However | when I started to remove the existing old shingles I see they were | nailed in the tar seal strip. Now I am not sure if back 27 years ago | the installer had used nail guns. But the shingles are dried and very | bad but still I have no leaks. | Aside from the warranty being voided isn't this a good place to put | the nail for the following reasons? | 1. The tar will seal around the nail shaft and the head after the sun | has done it's thing. | 2. The sealing might stop the nail from popping up in the future. | 3. The nail is a bit farther up from the above courses tab's lower | edge. | I am amazed that the nail is so close to the edge of the overlap | anyway when installed via the directions. I would think if anything | that the nail should go above the tar seal strip. That way any water | that might be pulled up under the shingle by capillary action would be | stopped by the seal of the two shingles before reaching the nail. | What do you think? |
nail above tar strip and over each notch. storm nailing is two nails over each slot (1 left of notch, 1right of notch). and one nail at each end.
the tar strip is for sealing the shingles NOT the nails.
TIP make sure nails go thru shingle below. if nailed above shingle below, the front of the shingle will lift. and not seal properly. do NOT remove plastic strip from shingles.
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NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!
IF nailed as you say, they will not do that. That is why you nail BELOW the tar strip

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DJW wrote:

People fixate over that little tar strip, but the mfg. instructions are the way to go. What shingle is it? The website might have additional instructions and ratings for wind, etc. Be sure that all is according to their instructions - deck, underlayment, etc. Nail length, placement and spacing are all important. If it is a laminated shingle or steep roof, there might be additonal options, like cementing tabs.
I am not a roofer, but I can almost guarantee that the tar strip doesn't have any effect on nails pulling. That would be determined by what you use to nail, and what you nail into.
If there is fascia work that needs to be done, do it before the shingles.
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Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
Do not nail above the tar strip
This is what CRAPPY roofers do to avoid having nail head show, and will degrade the life of your roof.
WHY?
Heat kills shingles.
Shingles lose their heat to the roof deck.
If you nail too high on the shingle, the shingle never sets right and will eventually curl, losing its abilty to get rid of its heat, accelerating the curling etc etc
If you nail properly, you will waste some shingle by inadvertantly nailing too low, but you will NOT get leaks from the nails that are below the tar strip
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I refuse to respond to this obvious troll.
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On Apr 27, 7:00 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Lamey) wrote:

I can't believe the entire thread. It should have only had two posts. The OP and a reply that said "READ THE DIRECTIONS, STUPID". Most of the posts are on the order of 'this is what I think'. The manufacturer knows the proper procedure and it is printed in neat little letters on every bundle wrapper.
Harry K
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