Mundane electrical problem.

Hi,
Please take a look at the following picture:
http://freeboundaries.com/PlugProblem.jpg
What it shows is that, becuase of the nature of the plug, I'm about to have a bit of a problem trying to push the fridge back to the wall. Are there any good solutions to this problem? As you can see, the walls are still open so I have some flexibility here. For example, I could move the outlets up above the fridge, but that would be ugly. I could replace the plug with one that has the wire go down at the 90 degree angle, but that feels a little too violent. I'm hoping to find some kind of a recessing solution.
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
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Why does a 90 degree plug not appeal to you? Seems like the most code compliant fix.
I'd also check the specs for my unit and make sure there isn't a minimum clearance required behind the fridge before I pushed it up against the wall.
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Aaron Fude wrote:

http://ezflatscreen.com/catalog/recessed-outlet-wall-plate-p-31.html
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On Mon, 9 Jun 2008 08:58:42 -0700 (PDT), Aaron Fude

If the box is deep enough you can use a clock receptacle. That recesses the plug about an inch
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On Jun 9, 12:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It looks as if there is more than 1 plug going into the outlet, so a clock outlet won't help. I think the easiest thing would be to put on a right angle plug.
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wrote:

It looks as if there is more than 1 plug going into the outlet, so a clock outlet won't help. I think the easiest thing would be to put on a right angle plug.
But I don't think having something else on the circuit with the frig, particularly something that has a cable such as pictured. That seems to be something like a microwave or something that shouldn't be on the same circuit.
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[snip]

I have had my microwave and refrigerator on the same circuit for a few years, with no problems (other than once when I mistakenly put some holiday lights on that circuit too).
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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Aaron Fude wrote:

Move the outlet DOWN to an opening in the back of the fridge.
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On Mon, 9 Jun 2008 08:58:42 -0700 (PDT), Aaron Fude

http://www.antonline.com/p_R42-689-W-NX_495450.htm
These don't work with a 90 degree plug.
You could change the box/outlet to a double gang.
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On Mon 09 Jun 2008 12:31:54p, metspitzer told us...

How would a double gang box/outlet solve the problem?
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It looks like "something" he has plugged into the outlet, already, has a right angle plug.
If he were to use the recessed outlet I gave a link for, it would not accommodate a right angle plug. He would have to have a normal outlet to plug that in.
Put in a double gang box. one recessed and one for the normal outlet.
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Use a recessed outlet (referenced above) for the straight plug, and a regular outlet for the right-angle plug. That requires a double gang.
Wayne
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On Mon 09 Jun 2008 01:35:40p, Wayne Whitney told us...

I would think that you couldn't combine the recessed outlet (as show in the example) with a standard outlet in the same double-gang box. Most recessed outlets I've seen are a one piece unit that includes the outlet cover. I guess one could jerryrig it, but I dunno...
Since the wall is still open, I would more likely install two single-gang boxes, one for the recessed and one for the regular.
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That would be the best. A recessed/surface mount combo might be very hard to find, now that you mention it. Mount the second box under the first box.
If there wasn't already a 90 in use I would just change the plug on the fridge.
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Hi, OP here. Actually it's a three-gang box back there. But it's still not clear whether it's possible to get a recessed outlet with no faceplate.
I'll explore some of the other suggestions as well.
Thanks!
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On Mon, 9 Jun 2008 18:22:16 -0700 (PDT), Aaron Fude

Put a 90 on the cord.
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metspitzer wrote:

Sometimes you need a 90 that is the opposite of the other one or it won't plug in very well. My old washer and (gas) dryer were like that. One cord faces down when plugged in and the other one goes up. We don't want to get into removed ground prongs and reverse polarity.
Tony
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On Mon 09 Jun 2008 02:11:56p, metspitzer told us...

As would I. Actually, I would probably change the 90 to std. and plug them both in a recessed. Changing a plug is *not* a big deal.
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I just did my kitchen over, and in hindsight I think I would have put the frig outlet in a base cabinet nest to the frig, similiar to a over the stove microwave that you plug in to the cabinet above. It's code for a microwave, so I wouldn't see why you can't do it for the frig.
Like the other poster said, the frig should be on its own circuit. But if you are plugging in a low power appliance like a gas stove that just needs electric for the ignition,clock,etc, it shouldn't be a problem.
Just curious, why is there a 3 gang box behind the frig? What else are you plugging in?
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