Motor 120V 3-Phase

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I bought for $5 an almost new looking 1 hp motor from a garage sale. From the Specs plate it looks like a 120Vac 3 phase motor. Is there such an animal? How do I wire one up wth the regular household plug?
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Well, now you know why it was cheap.
Charlie

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On Sun, 02 Nov 2003 18:08:05 +0000, klm wrote:

There is such an animal. Used them in industrial greenhouses, they were more reliable than single phase during brown outs and the like.
How to wire it up to your home? If you don't have three phases pumped into your house (and I don't know of anyone who does) then you don't. In theory you could wire up one phase, leave the other two phases out of the equation. It will work, but will probably burn out over time.
Suggestion: Go find a single phase 120Vac motor for $5 at another garage sale. Or check out people tossing old washers & dryers. The motors are often just fine in those beasts.
Carolyn
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it won't work if it's an induction motor.
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First you would have to get 3 phase, which you probably can't. Then you would have to get some transformers to reduce it to 120v, and you probably can't do that either.
Then, just plug it in!
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he can't get 3 phases to a residential area because the netwqork itself only brings one phase to an area, then splits it into 2 phases with a center-tap transformer.
but why would he need a transformer to bring it down to 120V? we get 120V per phase in Canada.
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j j wrote:

Hi, Because 3 Phase is only available in higher voltage. Tony

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probably
only
center-tap
120V
oh, right, I thought he meant he would need a transformer to bring the normal residential line to 120 V (since residential areas don't get industrial voltages, using a transformer didn't make sense to me)
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j j wrote:

Tony That may be true were you are but it is untrue in many places. Many utilities will provide 208/120 volt wye connected three phase service. It is an especially common service to large apartment houses. Since the US NEC forbids luminaires that require voltage over 150 in dwellings the 480/277 volt three phase service is of little use in such buildings. -- Tom
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only
center-tap
240v is single phase also. See http://home.att.net/~benmiller/elecsys.htm
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you get 2 120V phases into your house, and since they are 180 degrees out of phase, you can combine them to get a 240V phase, but at the entrance to your house you get 2 distinct 120V phases.
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No, you don't.
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of
your
really....
what do you get then, oh great HA HA?
3 wires come in the house from the utility, what are they?
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I'll tell ya. The 2 "phases" as you call them are not phases at all. Each is derived from the same primary phase. There is however, relative to their reference to neutral, 240v difference between them.
secondary primary windings windings
(1)----------) ( ) ( (n)----------) ( (*) ) ( (2)----------)
You know between either 1 or 2 and N you get 120v, and between 1 & 2 you get 240. Now add a tap at the (*) and say that's 60v to (n) - it would also be 60v from * to (2) and 180v between * and (1).
Now, would this be a 3-phase transformer? No, and that's why these kinds of services are called single phase 120/240.
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itself
http://home.att.net/~benmiller/elecsys.htm
of
your
Follow the link. Can't be much clear than that.

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probably
only
center-tap
You really need to inform California Edison of that then...since they have several like that in Indio, for starters..

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you get 3 phase power in a residential unit?
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have
One of my old customers there sure as hell did. We went to replace his old AC unit, and be damned if he didnt have 3 phase hitting the board.... Turns out, that everyone on his block was like that...and it was residential.

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Maybe with a phase generator.

No, it splits the primary phase into 2 low voltage "legs."
(Is a 12v-18v-24 volt transformer a 3-phase output?)
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only
center-tap
do you get all 3 voltages at the same time, and out of phase?
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