More on anodes, water heaters, a neat solution?

Awl --
From a site I found (and mentioned, iirc, by a poster in the previous thread), good info.
http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/Longevity/what-kills-water-heaters.html
Here's a neat alternative to magnesium anodes: http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/OrderPages/XCart/Power-Anode-For-Combos.html
Is this really effectve? This seems like a perty easy diy electronic project. Could a 12 V battery charger be used? what would be the connection points? Not exactly cheap, either, but anodes for combo-ports (below) are not cheap either, up to $160 from Sears.
Note that there are basically two configurations to water heater anodes: water heaters with a *separate* port, in which you screw the anode, and combo ports (like mine), which accept the anode AND hw connection (more expensive).
I think the separate port (3 ports total) is a much better design, makes replacing anodes much cheaper, easier. Even the powered anode is cheaper for this separate port.
--
EA



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the navy uses electronic control of ships to prevent excess rusting....
but at some point the cost of stuff to make a water heater last longer will exceed the cost of a brand new unit....
and other things may fail like the main gas valve.
for me its not worth the screwing around to extend the life of such a cheap device that costs less than 50 bucks a year to buy
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wrote:

the navy uses electronic control of ships to prevent excess rusting....
but at some point the cost of stuff to make a water heater last longer will exceed the cost of a brand new unit....
and other things may fail like the main gas valve.
for me its not worth the screwing around to extend the life of such a cheap device that costs less than 50 bucks a year to buy ======================================================== That's a useful perspective on the issue. This powered anode deal would have to extend the heater life 5 years to pay for itself.
Apparently not a, uh, hot item.... a search reveals no units.
Here's a Kenmore with a built-in powered anode: http://www.searsoutlet.com/d/product_details.jsp?pidi223&mode=buyUsedOnly&sid=IDx20110411x000008&ci_sku=N99169223&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw =
Also solid-state controls, fan (presumably exhaust -- whazzup wit dat???), electronic ignition. The reviews were inneresting, some locales really hammer the home-moaner, installation/permit wise. Even Trader4 would proly agree, many of these permits are off the wall. One reviewer's initial $225 installation charge (which is just pop-on, pop-off hoses) wound up being $1,000, for an hour's extra work.... holy shit....
Must be 'spensive, as you can't even get a firm price on this unit. I'd get one, if they gave me lifetime service for the fukn guar-own-teed-to-fail electronics.... sheesh.... Plus, iffin yer juice goes off, no hw.... altho I think back-up generators, once exotic, will proly be *expected* in a home sale.
--
EA







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One thing I would agree on is that you have an amazing penchant for turning something simple into something extraordinarily complex. My water heater goes every 10 to 15 years and I go buy another one. You take a journey down active corrosion protection system lala land. Now we're talking about Navy ship corrosion protection and $1000 installation charges. Good grief. Just go down to HD and buy a new one. Oh, wait a minute. You were recently bitching about them too, weren't you? That corrupt, overcharging HD place that you hate so much, does feature renting you a truck for a mere $20 so that you can get your new water heater home. And another feature is HD is open right now. So, maybe you should stop blowing smoke out your ass and go over there.
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wrote:

anode:http://www.searsoutlet.com/d/product_details.jsp?pidi223&mode=buyUs ...
One thing I would agree on is that you have an amazing penchant for turning something simple into something extraordinarily complex. My water heater goes every 10 to 15 years and I go buy another one. You take a journey down active corrosion protection system lala land. Now we're talking about Navy ship corrosion protection and $1000 installation charges. Good grief. Just go down to HD and buy a new one. Oh, wait a minute. You were recently bitching about them too, weren't you? That corrupt, overcharging HD place that you hate so much, does feature renting you a truck for a mere $20 so that you can get your new water heater home. And another feature is HD is open right now. So, maybe you should stop blowing smoke out your ass and go over there. ================================================ You don't have too many friends, do you.... You and the wife sleep in sep. rooms??
Bob Haller already made your hysterical points, very cogently. Just exploring ideas, and No, we're NOT talking about navy ship corrosion systems.... What did you do, BUY your economics degree??
--
EA




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On Sun, 27 Jan 2013 14:25:39 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Actually there ARE electronic anode replacements available for water heaters. If they are effective is another question. If they are cost effective is another one.
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On Jan 27, 9:08pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Wow, you figured that out? The link to exactly that was provided by EA in his original post where he posed the question. BTW, you claimed to have me killfiled, yet here you are, replying to my post. I guess you don't know how that works either.
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Yeah, the folks bought into that all-singing, all-dancing unit, but they really didn't have much choice. The original old-style unit exhausted into the chimney with the furnace. They got one of those fancy condensing furnaces that didn't have a chimney and the old brick item was taken down and blocked(was in very bad shape). So what to do? Get the fancy unit that exhausts through a PVC pipe through the basement wall. Doesn't need a draft from a chimney, has it's own fans. So instead of a soft whump when the thing fired off in the basement, they got this whining fan for a minute or so while the thing cleared any possible gas out of the flame chamber, then another whine while the burner fan whipped up and then finally it lit off. Really noisy in the middle of the night. So, no hot water during a power outage, the one place where gas appliances shine. They sell these things on the basis that the pilot light on the old-style units is burning money, but you could probably run a pilot light for a hundred years on the price difference. And the tank is going to go in 10-15 years anyway, that's not been improved at all. But it's "computerized" so that's OK.
Stan
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I think in addition to saving on the pilot light gas, which I agree is small, they are also more energy efficient because of the fact that they rely on a blower to move air through them. With the blower off, a lot less air moves through than with a traditional chimney vented unit. Less air moving through the core means less heat loss.
But I agree with your overall analysis. I think if you look at the price difference, it takes quite a long time to recover the upfront money. And if you have to run new venting, that also drives up the install cost, at least for the first time. And then you need an outlet close enough to plug it in, which could mean installing that too. With a conventional tannk, my whole gas bill in summer is less than $20, which includes all the water heated, plus some gas grilling. So, the energy loss of the tank can't be all that much. You might never recover the money.
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wrote:

I think in addition to saving on the pilot light gas, which I agree is small, they are also more energy efficient because of the fact that they rely on a blower to move air through them. With the blower off, a lot less air moves through than with a traditional chimney vented unit. Less air moving through the core means less heat loss.
But I agree with your overall analysis. I think if you look at the price difference, it takes quite a long time to recover the upfront money. And if you have to run new venting, that also drives up the install cost, at least for the first time. And then you need an outlet close enough to plug it in, which could mean installing that too. With a conventional tannk, my whole gas bill in summer is less than $20, which includes all the water heated, plus some gas grilling. So, the energy loss of the tank can't be all that much. You might never recover the money. ====================================================== You are almost guar-own-teed to never recover the $ diff. How much are those things, anyway?
Dood, you pissed off clare in CA as well?? How did you do that?? Oh, Oh, Oh, I know!!!!! By being a prick!!!!! Clare is one of the nicer more knowledgeable people around here. And, hey, didn't YOU once promise to killfile Moi???
--
EA



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You will also find active units for small boats. Mercruiser and Volvo both make them. I'm not sure it's worth the bother though.
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>Here's a neat alternative to magnesium anodes:http:// www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/OrderPages/XC...

May be as effective as something called a "water softener". Some can distill water to almost complete purity BEFORE it even goes into the house (or building).
(just use that)
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