monitor num times it turns on - automatically shut off if too many in 10 minutes.

Page 2 of 2  
On Wednesday, June 19, 2013 7:13:55 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

Thanks for your reply.... I thought of that... Actually I've been doing thi s for years... But the problem is that I'm not home all the time... Sometim es I'm back in the US, sometimes I'm out for 3-4 days... I need a 'cop' to monitor the pump for me at this point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
feedscrn wrote:

Got it. Maybe look for something to monitor water flow rather than pump cycles? Numerous soft water devices have such. What I'm thinking is something like this...
1. water flowing? yes shut off pump after x minutes wait x minutes, turn pump on, goto #1 no pump on goto #1 ____________________
Another thought is something like a sprinkler control that would simply turn the pump on at pre-set intervals for a pre-set amount of time.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 19 Jun 2013 12:52:06 -0700 (PDT), feedscrn

non-potable water for the house is a cistern, w/water supplied by the local government. The house has a pump that pushes water up to a tank on top of the house when it gets a bit low. This is an automatic process when "the pump is turned on". So far, no problem.

it: this public bathroom uses -our- private water. While I don't mind sharing.... anyone, it turns out- can leave the water running, especially if they are a bit inebriated, as there is a bar nearby.

device that will monitor how many times the pump turns on. If it's, say, 2x or 3x every 10 minutes... meaning that the water was most likely left on... this device would control a relay that will shut the pump off for an hour. Then try again after that. If the frequency of the pump turning on is spaced out more than 10 minutes at a time, then close the relay and let the pump do its thing.

If it is your water flowing through your pipes it seems the obvious solution would require a little plumbing.
Option one: If the connection to the public restroom is at the end of the plumbing supply of your house simply eliminate that connection and put a cap at a convenient location.
Option two: If the connection to the public restroom is located in the middle of the plumbing supply of your house simply remove the tee and replace it with an elbow that will supply the remainder of your house but not the restroom.
Obviously the same would apply for the drain and vent lines if the restroom is using your plumbing for that as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, June 19, 2013 7:23:19 PM UTC-4, Gordon Shumway wrote:

That's a nice idea... but it's not possible... That is why I'm looking for the original solution in the OP.... There are no pipes going to the bathroom... For some reason, the owner made sure of that.
The ONLY Thing I have control of is the pump, and the power to it... That is it...
Sorry it makes it complicated... but it's not my house... This is what I have to deal with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, June 19, 2013 7:23:19 PM UTC-4, Gordon Shumway wrote:

That's a nice idea... but it's not possible... All the pipes are undergroun d, inaccessible. That is why I'm looking for the original solution in the O P.... There are no accessible pipes going to the bathroom... For some reaso n, the owner made sure of that. I looked... :-(
The ONLY Thing I have control of is the pump, and the power to it... That i s it...
Sorry it makes it complicated... but it's not my house... This is what I ha ve to deal with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, June 19, 2013 7:34:17 PM UTC-4, feedscrn wrote:

I don't see how your cockamaime, nonexistent electronic doodad is going to make any difference either.
The toilet and sink simply drain the tank when the pump is off, yes? Takes more than an hour to drain the tank this way, yes?
If so you are not going to save a single drop of water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thanks for your post... nice try though.
Looking for an electronic device that can monitor how many times a device, say: a water pump- turns on in, maybe 10 minutes. If it turns on more than twice, wait an hour and look again. If it is not turning on so often after an hour, let it rip.
Rinse and repeat.
The thing is that the cistern has precious water.... and I don't want to see it all go down the drain... literally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So, drunks use the bathroom and you want to shut off the water? I see that being a problem. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
This is the situation, we live in the Caribbean renting a house. The non-potable water for the house is a cistern, w/water supplied by the local government. The house has a pump that pushes water up to a tank on top of the house when it gets a bit low. This is an automatic process when "the pump is turned on". So far, no problem.
This house, it turns out, has a public bathroom attached to it. And you guessed it: this public bathroom uses -our- private water. While I don't mind sharing.... anyone, it turns out- can leave the water running, especially if they are a bit inebriated, as there is a bar nearby.
Usually this is not a problem, as I am home a lot and would just shut the pump off if it's the middle of the night or something.
I'm thinking of an automatic solution to this... To automate this, I need a device that will monitor how many times the pump turns on. If it's, say, 2x or 3x every 10 minutes... meaning that the water was most likely left on... this device would control a relay that will shut the pump off for an hour. Then try again after that. If the frequency of the pump turning on is spaced out more than 10 minutes at a time, then close the relay and let the pump do its thing.
Does any manufacturer make anything like this?
Any helpful suggestions are appreciated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok how about this Buy a programmable timer from radio shack etc and set it to turn on the power for 10 minutes every hour. That will be the most the pump can then run. You don't need to monitor the status of the pump or anything, just cycle the power. The pump will come on durning the 10 minutes when it needs to. If you are using less water the it won't come on during the 10 minute window. Simple Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.