masonry courtyard wall - how to build a 45 degree corner


Hi,
I plan on building a 3 or 4 ft courtyard wall. I would like to use lightweight concrete block, dry stacked, and covered in a fiberglass reinforced stucco (e.g. QuickWall). The wall is not load bearing. My designed calls for some 45 degree corners. Is there a standard method to get the 45 degree corner with standard 8 x 8 x 16 cement blocks (CMUs)? The QuickWall manufacturer recommends a tight running bond pattern for the dry stacked block. Thx.
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Instead of using standard 8 x 8 x 16 cement blocks, why not use 45 Degree Outside Corner blocks?
Look at the third block from the bottom of this page:
http://www.westbrookblock.com/products/sshapes01.htm
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

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Being the lazy man that I am I would form up and pour the corner if no 45 blocks were to be had, cutting wood is still easier than cutting concrete.
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There are block companies that make 45* corners. The more usual method would be to miter the corners with a saw. You will need 1/2 blocks to make running bond and/or custom cut blocks to complete the work anyway. It would be an unusual circumstance to have everything come out in full block units.
I would slush and rebar the corners and 4' o.c. with the quickwall. How tall are you planning to go?
You might be able to take the necessary blocks to a working job site where they are laying block. A six pack or case and a $20 bill can accomplish wonders, especially when you can ask to have them done over the next day or two. ___________________________ Keep the whole world singing. . . . DanG

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Thanks for the reply. The wall will only be 3 or 4 ft high. I like the idea of the 45 degree corner block, though it doesn't seem to be readily available where I'm at (Northern California). The problem with mitering the corner blocks is that other than being a PITA I would have a seam at each corner, and not a running bond pattern. I imagine if I slush and rebar the corner, it wouldn't really matter. I had planned to slush, rebar, and tie into the foundation rebar every few ft anyway.
Living in the land of slab foundations, I can't remember the last time I saw a job site with a lot of block work. Thanks again!
DanG wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

I can't imagine a company that deals in block that wouldn't special order for you. At a cost, of course, at a cost.
Harry K
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I believe we are all thinking about a block manufacturer, not a Borg type store. Almost all housing in central Florida is block and slab-on-grade. Even if your local housing is not block, I know that any commercial work will probably have block. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ DanG A live singing Valentine, the most romantic thing you can do with your clothes on snipped-for-privacy@okchorale.org (local) http://www.singingvalentines.com/ (national)

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Thanks to everyone for the info. It sounds like the best course is to check around for the 45 degree corner block. Before my initial post, I had called one landscape supply yard and asked about the 45 degree block. He said that not only didn't he have it, but no one does. This lead me to believe I was thinking about the problem wrong. Now it sounds like I was just talking with the wrong person and the wrong outfit....
DanG wrote:

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