manufactured homes

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A trailer or manufactured home is no match in value in the long run for CBS (concrete block/stucco) houses. Unfortunately there are people who will try to put it on par with CBS homes.
If you can't afford CBS, likely now with current housing costs, I would go for it, a manufactured home is something that you can adapt to, but they are sometimes difficult to sell and you definitely won't see much of an appreciation of value outside of actual land appraisal itself. Assume that you'll lose money in the manufactured home in the long run, but the property might end up being worth substantially more than the house.

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Nathan Gant wrote:

A home is going up across the street from me now. It has poured basement walls, and they brough in the main home parts in pieces. The home body in 2 parts, and then a 2 part roof, and 1 2nd floor extended window. They build the garage on the spot. And not they are bricking the thing up.
I was disappointed to see this thing going up when they started because I though it was going to be some rinky dink elcheapo job. I'm pretty impressed at this point and wonder if my own home was build in this fashion, though I doubt it due to its construction.
Is this a manufactured home I was looking at?
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Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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On Mon 13 Jun 2005 10:52:33a, CL (dnoyeB) Gilbert wrote in alt.home.repair:

It's more likely a modular home. There are both similarities and differences. The following link gives a good explanation of both:
http://www.wickmarshfield.com/HomeSearch/MMCompared.htm
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Wayne Boatwright տլ
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I had shopped for existing homes, both stick built and manufactured, and all realtors I spoke with said manufactured homes on permanent foundations, in this area, appreciate comparably to stick built. We happened across five very private acres and couldn't resist. Last year I put a new Silvercrest on five acres outside of Yelm, WA. I put it on a stem wall foundation; the personal property title was eliminated after the final inspection. My research found that Silvercrest was one of the best in this part of the country. I'd do it again in a heartbeat.
I upgraded to a 6:12 roof, Hardie lap siding all the way around, Hardie shakes on the gables, and I built a gable roof attached deck on the front. From the outside, nobody knows it's a manufactured home. The wood stove installer, the satellite tv installer, and furniture and appliance delivery people have all been inside and didn't know it was manufactured till I told them.
There are some telltale signs if you know what to look for. For instance, the interior marriage walls are six inches. This may or may not be obvious, depending on your floor plan. All the sinks plumbing comes up through the floor at the back of the cabinets, rather than out of the wall. There won't be an attic access hole unless the previous owner put one in-they're not required by HUD. That was one detail I missed during the purchase process. Kinda silly, I think. While they were setting up my house, four different contractors needed access to the attic. The first contractor cut the hole at a location of my approval, and I went ahead and trimmed it out.
If you're a hard core DIYer, there are a few idiosyncracies to be aware of. Manufactured homes are inspected by L&I at the factory during the construction process, and L&I inspects all remodeling, changes, and additions to the home, rather than the local building department. If you live in Pierce or King county, this can be quite an advantage as you won't have to deal with those county building departments. When you go to the L&I office to pull a permit, the first thing they will ask for are the D.A.P.I.A. drawings. D.A.P.I.A. drawings (I don't remember what words DAPIA represents) are the manufacturer's engineered drawings for your home. Drawings are for new construction at the factory and for most repairs and remodels once the house is installed. The factory field rep told me if they didn't have them available in house, they could have them in 24 hours from an engineering firm out of Chicago. L&I has a pamphlet available that tells all about their responsibilities and a list of repairs, fixes, and remodels that need a permit.
My house had a couple rafters that twisted and bowed. The factory sent out an independent contractor to do the repair. He had to have the drawings in hand to do the work. I changed out a bathroom window I didn't like (I put in a larger one); I had no problem getting the D.A.P.I.A. drawing from the factory. The deck I built was a peculiar process. Basically, I built a dormer on the house for which I obtained a drawing and had inspected by L&I. The rest of the deck was freestanding and was inspected by Thurston County building department. There is a correct method for tying together the dormer roof and deck gable roof for a seamless looking roof line.
All wall studs are 16 in. O.C. except for the 6 inch marriage line wall I mentioned earlier. You'll find that wall has extra studs and blocking.
One thing I don't like but have to live with is that the floor insulation is blown in. Manufactured homes have a fabric belly pan, and that holds in the insulation. So, to get to in-floor plumbing or wiring, or whatever, I have to slice the fabric, salvage the insulation, do my work, put the insulation back in, and seal up the slice with a special belly pan tape. There are a few tricks to make the process easier, but it's just a bit more hassle than removing and replacing batts.
Manufacturers do use some proprietary materials. My common living areas have 9 1/2 foot ceilings with 7 1/2 inch crown moulding. Imagine my surprise to find out the crown was made of styrofoam. Once installed and painted, you'd never know. I was able to scrounge a couple sticks from the factory service team. I've never seen the stuff retail. The exterior trim around doors, windows, and corners, and the fascia, are 5/4 O.S.B. with a wood grain face. White wood is a good substitute as long as it's not too close to the O.S.B. so that the differences would be glaringly obvious.
Hope you enjoy your new home, Steve
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snipped-for-privacy@mindlessspring.com says...

Yes, things definitely have changed -- better manufactured homes built within the last 10 years or so are built to some fairly tough standards, better than stick-built building codes in some parts of the country. If you can avoid the really obvious mobile-home appearance (low roof, cheap skirting, etc.), they can appreciate like stick-built homes.

A professional building materials supplier will be able to get foam moldings and trim. It's actually a relatively established product, a lot of stick-built homes use foam moldings inside and out, even some fairly high-dollar homes. I've seen it in homes over $300/square foot construction cost.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

This was true of older mobile homes, back when they really were considered mobile. But it is now quite common to eliminate the title on a permanently-installed manufactured home, so it becomes just like any other improvement on the property.
Washington State has even made it illegal to discriminate against approved manufactured homes in zoning -- cities have to zone them essentially the same as any other single-family residence.
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says...

is a

That was the point I was trying to make. Several years ago I was talking to some contractors that were getting into the modular homes. From what they said from a visit to a manufactor there were two production lines , one for mobile homes and one for modular homes. They were made almost the same. One had a title and it was called a mobile home and the other line did not have a title to it and was called a mudular home. The town and county I live in will not allow mobile homes in some areas. They will allow the modular homes. I can not tell the differance just by looking at them. Some of the modular homes still look like the mobile homes to me. I hate to bring it up but it is like Bill Clinton's sex. It may not be sex as he understands it.
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