Low voltage wiring - NEC question

I'm planning to install some outdoor low voltage landscape lighting using a transformer UL rated as indoor/outdoor mounted in the garage.
According to what I've been able to find wrt NEC, if the wiring is run *through* a wall it must be enclosed in conduit. However, if it is run along a wall, is there any need to enclose it or do anything special?
Thanks, Martin
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The upside to using conduit is avoiding interruption. Animals have the annonying tendency to chew through exposed wiring. Putting them in conduit helps avoid that.
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Thanks for the reply. Just to clarify, I meant running the wire along the inside wall of the garage. The NEC, from what I picked up from Web searches, says you have to use conduit to run the wire through a wall, from inside to outside. I'm sure it's safe to run the low voltage wire along an inside wall, using fasteners intended for use with wiring, but I'm not sure what the NEC says about it...
On Sat, 3 Sep 2005 12:41:22 -0400, "wkearney99"

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<Martin> wrote in message

As you are dealing with low voltage wire that is (hopefully) suitable for direct burial.
I don't even think NEC rules apply. much more than "portable appliance cords" for the 120v wire between the outlet and the transformer. As that is all inside, it's not even an issue.
But just simple logic that any wire going through a block or concrete wall should be able to be removed easily and should not be cemented in tight. Putting it in a conduit in new construction allows it to be removed to be checked or replaced if need be. Just drilling a hole and plugging it with a bit of insulation would work fine.
But if I were you I'd run it in a bit of conduit outside the garage at least if the wire is not in the ground right away to prevent damage from lawnmowers or weed-whackers
Also it's a good idea to keep any wires in a conduit where they are likely to be subjected to damage or even pulling by little children.
Inside a garage is a very dangerous area for exposed wires, lots of things move, can bump into walls, and have sharp edges.
AMUN
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Martin <> wrote:

It needs to be protected.
If it is run low, where it is subject to being hit by a lawnmower or weed wacker, then yes.
If it is up high or otherwise somehow protected from damage, then no.
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<Martin> wrote in message

NEC doesn't apply for low voltage , you do what you need to do with it, just use your own judgment. Its like the cable and phone companies - they drill through any walls and install it anyway it suits them. No conduits. To verify NEC doesn't apply call your local city inspector Monday.
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Bzzzt! Wrong. Thank you for playiong our game.
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wrote:

Ok educate me than, its been a while I've looked anything up in NEC. What *section* of NEC you were referring to that requires conduit for low voltage cables like 12V landscape, TV coax, telephone and thermostat control wires in the house? Have you ever seen conduits for those inside your house besides the service entry points from the street?
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Low voltage cabling (in fact every current carrying conductor, no matter what its intended purpose) attached to the house is indeed subject to NEC. As mentioned in my prior post, my copy of the current NEC is not on the PC I'm using at the moment. When I return to the USA in late September (2005) I can give you the references and/or post some quotes. Presumably you will have found your answers by then but if you still need it let me know.

You can use conduit or a pass through bushing to bring low voltage cables through the wall. As someone (yourself?) already mentioned, the cable supplied with low voltage landscape lighting is rated for exterior use, including direct burial so that's a non-issue.
Most folks prefer to protect exposed low voltage cables in the garage and though it's not required you may wish to consider doing so as well. IME, cables in a garage which are not out of reach are subject to damage from garden tools, car doors, bicycles and other implements of destruction.
Hope this helps.
--
Regards,
Robert L Bass
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These are either article 725 class 2 or class 1 circuits, depending on the current limiting in the transformer. Class 1 (not current limited) is treated just like regular power circuits. Class 2 (less than 30v, current limited) still requires protection from physical damage.
Lack of enforcement does not change the code. I bet there are some AHJs who would say you do need a permit to install landscape lighting but there is no easy way to enforce it. Bear in mind plenty of people do service upgrades without perrmits and I doubt anyone would say replacing a panelboard does not involve the NEC.
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Our Township code says I need a permit for any job costing $200 or more. If I buy a new panel (including a bunch of breakers) for $150 and reuse most of the existing breakers in the new panel (thus staying under the $200), where is the requirement for a permit?
(The main breakers are in the garage back-to-back with the meter, so I can easily kill the power to the panel I'm replacing.)
Perce
On 09/04/05 12:44 pm snipped-for-privacy@aol.com tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

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If you stay under the limit you may well be OK. However, you might also want to inquire about any *special* rules concerning panel upgrades. Many locations insist on a permit / inspection for service entrance upgrades due to the hazards involved.
Some towns and even some electric service providers insist that a licensed electrician complete a service upgrade. I worked on my own plumbing, electrical and other systems for many years but I don't recommend that others do a service upgrade without at least consulting an experienced tradesman.

Note that in most (though not all) cases removing the meter head from the pan kills the power to the panel. I have seen a few cases where this was not so though. Most were illegal connections where some doofus decided to cheat the electric company out of a few dollars a month. Fortunately, most of the DIYers I know are a lot smarter than that.
--
Regards,
Robert L Bass
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Better wait till Tuesday if you're in the USA.
From:Fred snipped-for-privacy@Cross.Bal

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Who says the NEC doesn't apply to low voltage? Check it out per Mark Hult's link:
http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryIDd4&itemID901&URLPublications/necdigest/About%20the%20NEC/The%202005%20NEC/Proposal s%20for%202005%20Edition&cookie%5Ftest=1
Martin
wrote:

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<Martin> wrote in message

You've referred to *Proposals* for 2005 NEC Edition with 2815 pages! Did all the proposals get into the 2005 NEC code book? So for low voltage part of the landscaping what section of the 2005 NEC requires conduit and burial depth that OP was referring to? In any case, I did refer the OP to contact his local inspector for any requirements.
No permit required for the low voltage part of the landscape lighting installation or other low voltage installation like phone wiring or coax cables out here. I assume this is the case for many cities so how would NEC be enforced?
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Thanks for the correction, Tuesday it is. I forgot government workers don't work on Monday like I do.

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Thanks for all the responses.
Let me restate the question: If low voltage (12v landscape) wire is run along (not internal to) the indoor walls/ceiliing of a garage, does the NEC have anything to say about it? Shovels hitting the wire, things falling on it, etc. aren't a concern.
To clarify (based on the bits and pieces of the NEC that I've picked up on-line), Chapter 3 of the NEC absolutely states that you *must* use conduit to go through a wall. Also, the standard wire sold for landscape lighting is suitable for direct burial. Per the NEC, the wire is supposed to be buried (I believe) 6" deep, but I doubt that anybody does that other than in areas that might be core aerated. It's usually just placed under the mulch. There are no NEC requirements for use of conduit outdoors.
The problem here is, as I said, that there is lots of talk on-line about the NEC but it isn't actually available for reference on-line. I just checked the card catalog at the local library via the Web, and they have a copy in the reference section. When I find the answer, I'll post it...
Martin
On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 11:45:44 -0400, Martin <> wrote:

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<Martin> wrote in message

In your case I would just use some common sense. If exposed wire is run where it may be damaged, run it in conduit, other wise I do not believe it is necessary. Greg
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Feed Through Bushing
<Martin> wrote in message

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