Low Voltage AC question

Other than doorbells and furnace humidifiers, what would use low voltage in my house. The reason I'm asking is my house (40 years old and newly acquired) has a bunch of transformers which I'm trying to track down. Do furnaces and AC's use LV. How about alarms systems? Thx.
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SofaKing wrote:

alarm systems. But, usually the xformers are built into the components of those systems, and not sticking out in the open like most doorbell transformers do.
There are also low voltage outside lighting systems for pathways and such, but you probably know if you have any of those.
If it 'twas me, I'd disconnect them one by one (either the line voltage side or the low voltage side) and see if you can discover what ain't working anymore when they're not supplying power.
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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Thanks Jeff. I used my tone generator and probe (from Jameco) and tracked it down to a wall on the other side of my two Air Conditioning units. I'm wondering if the AirCon units them selves required the LV. I have Oil furnaces (still) and I think two of the other LV transformers go to the furnaces, and on other to the alarm. Still searching for the deedle-deedle....thx again.

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A friend of mine has low voltage relays for his lighting in his 40-50 year old home. Check out despard and ge low voltage lighting systems. The relays can be put in the darnest places. switches look like horizontal rocker switches and have little tiny wires connected to the switches. (humor intended) The lv stuff is like 22 to 18 gauge not the 14 or 12 used for line voltage.
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Wow. Yes in fact there is an old rocker switch (n/c) that is very near. It looks open in the middle and connected when moved to either the left or the right. Why use a relay/rocker?

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SofaKing wrote:

Cheaper wire cost and less voltage drop on heavy loads are the first wo things I can think of; if the wire runs are long enogh so that the savings offset the cost of the xformer/relay and their installation labor.
Might also be easier to pull thinner wire through on a retrofit job, and being low voltage it might avoid code issues like how often and with what it's secured to studs and joists, and how it must be protected in exposed runs.
If it used the right class of wire insulation it might be permisable to rout it through existing air handling ductwork, depending on local codes.
Just my .02,
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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It was a modern alternative to standard wiring/switching which was to revolutionize the electrical industry using space-age technology. In other words, someone tried to create a better mousetrap but in the end, the tried and true method won out.
Imagine not being able to replace a switch with a dimmer?
Also - the "system" was sold with other benefits and features, such as "master control panels" where every switch relay could be wired to one or more "master stations" where you could control 16-24 lights and see what is on and what is off at a glance, as well as be able to push buttons which controlled assigned "groups" of switches, or perfom assigned tasks (1-on, 2-3-4 off, 5 on, 6 unchanged, 7-8-9 on, 10-11 off) @ 7am... and vice versa at 10pm...
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HA HA Budys Here wrote:

I never could get very exited about the later "X-10" equipment either.
Guess I'm just a Luddite at heart..
Jeff
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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"If you can smile when things are going wrong, you've thought of someone
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote:

Hmmm. I have two of those GE LV relay systems operating the lights in my halls and stairways. Work very well. Otherwise I would have had to run three and four way switches and the attendant costly cable through five floors with two and sometimes three switches on each floor.
Most European countries use relays with timers (like one minute) for their stairway and hallway lighting in apartment buildings. That way the tenants can't leave the lights on all night.

I doubt I'd want to dim the hall or stairway lights.

Didn't buy any of this garbage. The big problem now is to replace the parts, in particular the little rocker switches. My kid broke one a couple of years ago and after calling around the country (GE sold the division) I finally gave up trying to find an original and bought a Leviton flat panel type--it's a popular series but I don't remember the name--110V rocker switch for $30 (yikes!). IOW I have a 110V switch switching LV (no box either <g>).
FeelFree
To say anything you want.
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