Lightening

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If lightening hit my well head, a pipe about 2 feet tall with a cap sticking out of the ground, can it follow the pipe down to the water, come in to the pump and out to my show head and zap me?
--
LSMFT

I look outside this morning and everything was in 3D!
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Yup. -----
- gpsman
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On 8/10/2010 5:40 PM, LSMFT wrote:

nope
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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Well, lightning (no e) can go almost anywhere it "wants" but it's headed to the earth. Since most of your pipe down to the water is underground, and the earch around the pipe isn't bone dry or even very dry (is it?) I doubt it would do that. I think it would head from the pipe straight to the ground. But what do I know?
Also lightning tends to hit high things and pointed things. If your well is nearer your house than the height of the house, or nearer a tree than the height of the tree, it might not be too attractive.
And your pipe and cap are probably not pointed.
There was a lightning hotline 25 years ago. Maybe it's still around. OTOH, the person on the phone kept assuming I lived in Florida and seemed to wonder why I was asking if I didn't live in Florida.
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mm wrote:

Actually the "point" is to deter lightning by streaming negatively charged ions in the rod's vicinity. In this sense, it actually repels lightning. If the lightning bolt does not take the hint, however, the rod - with or without a point - will attempt to channel the current to the earth.
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HeyBub wrote:

There is a company that sells lightning protection that allegedly works like that. It doesn't work. Their devices do work as lightning rods. On the other hand, the limited research that has been done is that a somewhat rounded rod end is slightly more effective as a lightning rod than a sharp point.
Lightning would be happy to hit the well cap. As someone said, there are probably higher targets. Lightning rods work by being higher than the building they protect.

There is a very light chance of a problem in a shower. But I believe the advice from "experts" is to not take a shower. And to not use a wired phone.
--
bud--



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wrote:

And by being pointed. Bub is right. I forgot and had it that part wrong. I'm still not sure of the details and it's too hot here to look it up, but somehow the pointed and high nature of the lighning rods with their points discharges, or something, the likely target and makes lightning much less likely to strike. Because if lightning did strike the lightning rod, the relatively small diameter wire that leads to the ground could never carry 1/100th of the current it would have to, would probably vaporize if metal can do that, but at least melt, and the house and its contents would have to carry much of the lightning to ground.
Somone told me a story about selling lightning rods and one of his customers broke off the "needles" because he thought it looked nicer that way, but they work either not at all or not much without the needles. .

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mm wrote:

There is an alternate protection scheme that claims that their systems prevent strikes. It is not accepted by lightning researchers and the lightning protection industry. Lightning starts with a stepped leader that descends from the clouds in steps. The path of the stepped leader will not be affected by a lightning rod. The final step is to an upward leader from something connected to earth. The emitters in the alternate scheme do not prevent strikes - tests include NASA and airports. One source of details (fairly technical) is: http://www.lightningsafety.com/nlsi_lhm/Uman_Rakov.pdf
Lightning rods are designed to be the closest point on a building for the final descent step. They are higher than the building. They work by being the preferential point for lightning to strike (if it is going to strike the building). The source above says "properly designed conventional lightning protection systems ... provide lightning attachment points and paths for the lightning current to follow from the attachment points into the ground without harm to the protected structure."
The only research I have heard of is that the most effective point on the end of a rod is about 5/8" diameter, and there is not much difference anyway. (One source is an engineer that designs lightning protection.)
(Lightning rods are now called air terminals.)

Complete nonsense. Lightning rod down conductors are plenty large enough to carry the full lightning strike. You need far less conductor for the about 0.01 millisecond duration of lightning than you would need for a continuous current. Lightning rod systems get hit all the time and remain intact and effective.

The proof by anecdote. The building was hit by lightning? Or someone thought the rods wouldn't work? (But I wouldn't advise changing an installed system.)
--
bud--

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wrote:

I'd be afraid of an air terminal. I'd be afraid the bus would drop me off at the terminal, I'd walk out the door and fall 500 feet.
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Metal or PVC pipe? Assuming you mean metal, it would be highly unlikely but possible. It is looking for ground and it found it so why would it go back up to your shower? However if the whole volume of water built up a charge (unlikely), it may be possible. The whole scenario changes though if the lightning hits the house instead of the well head pipe.
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Yes.
--
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Since anything is poosible, just to be safe, I have a suggestion.
Avoid the possibility by not using the shower if lightning (no e) might occur.
Instead, go outside in the rain and wash up au natural.
I believe that there's a pipe about 2 feet tall with a cap sticking out of the ground that you could rest your soap and shampoo on.
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On Tue, 10 Aug 2010 17:52:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Yea, but it would be best if he lays down on his back, rather than standing up like in a shower. Lightning hits the highest object, so if he lays down there is less chance of getting hit. However, a word of caution. DO NOT lay down near a "sexy" member of the opposite sex. If he begins getting an erection, his dick becomes the highest object. And if lightning strikes, there goes the family jewels up in smoke....
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I try to stay out of the shower when lightening is in the area.
I remember one instance in our area where lightning hit a tree that was 30 feet or more from a feller's house. The lightning followed the shallow roots of the tree right over to the foundation of the house, went up the wall of the house and popped open a hole in the drywall just above the head of the sleeping homeowner in his bedroom. Lightning is flat out unpredictable.
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wrote:

Several times in the old farmhouse my mother grew up in, lightning hit the cistern pump at the back of the house, jumpedthrough the doorway to the aluminum edge trim of the kitchen counter, from there to the Findlay Oval cookstove, and from there to the sink which was grounded to the wellwater pump - blowing chips of enamel off the stove and the sink each time.
Hit the old oak tree in front of the house numerous times too. - and the lightning rods on both the house and the barn. The farmstead stood (actually still stands) on a hill - out in the open with nothing else around, about a mile and a half downstream of the Conestoga Dam in Ontario Canada - and the old oak was about 3 times as tall as the farmhouse.
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Do you mean lightning?? Lightening is what Michael Jackson did to his skin.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

LOL, I didn't catch that.
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I've seen three rather strong instances with lightning that would keep me out of the shower. In all three cases, the strike was close enough to cause a scare or damage.
1. The utility pole outside on the street is the last one on the street and it has a guy wire to anchor it on the side with no lines. When a strike hit, there was enough power to blow out a trough of dirt from the cable to the curb and blow out a 6" hunk of curbing. Power was not lost.
2. During a storm, lighting hit someplace nearby. My family room slider has an aluminum frame at ground level. There was an arc that went from the door frame to the baseboard heat under the sofa, a distance of about 6 feet.
3. About 6 weeks ago, it hit someplace outside. The arc(s) burned a hole in the downspout where it was a few inches from a spotlight fixture. It burned the bulbs, the inside plug and a controller and receptacle, travelled from the detached garage, back into the house, blew out a breaker in the main panel and took out my TV, Receiver, doorbell, DSL modem.
In all cases, the hit was never pinpointed but the power surge was enough to show its ugly head. Could have been 10 feet, 100 feet, or a half mile. I'd stay out of the shower.
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Once, I was playing Nintendo during a thunderstorm, holding a controller with my sweat soaked hands, and I received a light shock through the controller when lightning struck off in the distance.
It seemed so odd considering that the strike wasn't even very close. There were at lest several seconds delay between light and sound.
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 02:40:16 +0000 (UTC), ShadowTek

Wow to all these stories. How long between the light and the shock you felt?
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