Light Bulb Wattage

When I was on vacation, I purchased a lamp at an antique store. Although I am not sure it is an antique, I noticed that the wattage reads 660W. I would like to put a 100W bulb in this lamp.
I have never seen a 660W lamp. Could this be correct?
This is just a single bulb lamp.
Many thanks.
Corinne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is just a rating for the socket type, a 100 watt lamp will be fine

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wow, that was a speedy reply, and I thank you.
Corinne
RBM wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you Wayne.
Great group here, with quick replies.
Corinne
Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon 28 Mar 2005 08:35:41p, Corinne wrote in alt.home.repair:

Your lamp's socket is rated at a maximum wattage of 660 watts. You can use any wattage less than that.
--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You're quite welcome. Enjoy that lamp!
On Mon 28 Mar 2005 08:57:21p, Corinne wrote in alt.home.repair:

--
Wayne Boatwright
____________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a 660 watt rated socket but the fixture says 60 watt max. Hotter bulbs can melt things.like plastic and cloth shades, even socket wiring.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It was speedy, but probably incorrect. If the lamp is truly an antique, it's unlikely that the insulation on the fixture wires inside the lamp is able to withstand the heat of a 100W bulb.
Best to stick with 60W, or use a compact fluorescent.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While the *socket* may be rated for 660W, that doesn't mean that the *wires* are. If the lamp is an antique, the fixture wires inside it probably do *not* have insulation that will withstand the heat generated by high-wattage bulbs.
Simplest solution is to use a 23W compact fluorescent bulb. The light output is equivalent to a 100W incandescent bulb, but it produces far less heat.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is a compact flourescent bulb one of those squiggly type lights, or is this just a long tube like bulb?
Thank you.
Corinne
Doug Miller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One of these: http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=productDetail&productId6922-3-29115
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you so much Doug.
Corinne
Doug Miller wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CFL or compact flourescent are 75% more efficient, 75% less heat. Cheap ones have poor color rendition, light it rated in Kelvin or color temperature as to its warmth. Look at what is sold likely your more expensive brand will have a nicer color and all are rated in Kelvin. 3700- 3900 is a good range. New coatings and phospors are being introduced all the time by every manufacturer. Talk to a store that knows bulbs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nearly all compact fluorescent lamps other than dollar store ones and FUL types (largish U-tube usually 12 watts and thankfully becoming less common) have a rated color rendering index of 82.
Ever since the 1980's and as recently as a couple months ago, most have had 82 CRI and a color temperature of 2700 K. Sylvania has in recent years made their usual 3000K. Less common standard color temperatures in the USA are 3500, 4100, and 5000K. My favorite color temp. is 3500K. The most easily available 3500K screw-in model is Sylvania's "Daylight". I see those at Lowes. Yes, they call this one Daylight even though it's 3500K and "Daylight" is usually considered at least 5,000, often 6500 K.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hey Don,
Many thanks for the great info.
Corinne
Don Klipstein wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don is right about Kelvin ratings ,I messed up my numbers and added 1000 k. With a flourescent you will be ok with 25 watt giving off 100 watt equivilant or even a larger one giving 150 equivilant.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Very informative. Great group here. Thanks.
Corinne
m Ransley wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.