Leaking pipe joint.

I have very high water pressure at my house and am having a hard time getting a complete seal on the water connections of my new roman tub filler. I had to use a couple of brass adapters to go from a 1/2" copper line to a 3/4" brass connection, so I have more joints than usual. I am using teflon tape on all the joints and keep getting a little seepage around the joints. The previous connections on the old faucet with 1/2" connectors were what I think are called slip joints, using cone-shaped rubber washer. The brass fittings do not have any kind of compression joint or washer to seal off the water, except on the end that connects to the copper line, where a compression ring seems to be sealing just fine. The other connections depend on the sealant on the threads. Should I be using permanent pipe sealer at the threads that do not connect directly to the faucet and the water line? Or is s there something better than teflon tape that I should use on the joints? I am wrapping about 2 layers of the teflon tape around the male connectors, starting at the first threads of each joint.
Thanks! Joe Meyer
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<< Or is s there something better than teflon tape that I should use on the joints? >>
Teflon tape is used to reduce assembly friction so that otherwise perfectly machined joints will seal. It has some disadvantages, like bits of the tape breaking loose and winding up where they cause problems later. Teflon pipe dope is more attuned to the real world where imperfections exist, so it is preferred by many professionals. Judge for yourself what will work best for you. If you decide that a semi-permanent sealer is needed, buy some Permatex #3 at any auto supply store. This has been a favorite of aircraft and auto mechanics for decades, and I've heard that a Chevy small block without it on the important gaskets won't make 1000 miles <G>.
<< I have very high water pressure at my house >>
Consider installing a pressure regulator in the system to take the strain off the fittings. HTH
Joe
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I went through a similar issue recently. ( I am not an expert)
I used the 1/2 inch brass fittings - one end copper pipe, the other threaded into fixture.
No matter how tight, and degree of Teflon tape, I still had a very slow drip.
After several frustrating efforts, I used pipe joint compound and it really made a difference. I think it is called pipe dope. I think its much better lubricant and allowed me to get that extra 1/2 turn that made the leak stop.
Google search for my thread: Re: Plumbing - fitting leaks - What am I doing wrong
Louis

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Wow. This really is a dope smoker's paradise. First drywall butt oints, now pipe joints? Keep the ideas coming dudes. You guys are smokin!
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yea those romans got rid of mine and got a greek
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Modern copper/brass threaded fittings are crap!! They come from China and are very poorly machined. Maybe you can find some good ones at an industrial plumping supplier.
I persoanlly hate Teflon tape. I'd much rather use dope like Rector #5 sealant.
If you end up with one tiny drop every minute or so just let it lime up. Just don't finish the wall until you make sure it's sealed itself.

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