Laminate countertop installation sequence question

Watched all the video's on you tube and read everything I can find. Some say to put the edge on first, and route it even to the top and some say to put the top on first, and put the edge band up to the bottom of the top laminate, then route it. Which is best for a countertop that has had the original laminate top removed and a new one is to be installed..
R
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snipped-for-privacy@live.com wrote:

My view (no pun intended) is that the top should go on first, then trimmed to match the edge. If you do it in reverse, edge first, then you'll forever be looking at the edge of the laminate as you skin your dinner (opossum anyone?).
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Edge goes on first, so the top will lap over it and you won't see the edge of the edge. The edge is trimmed with the straight bit, the top gets trimmed with the 22 degree bit. That will take away a little less than the total thickness of the top material giving a clean reveal..
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On 8/1/2012 11:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@live.com wrote:

Edgeband first. Trim flush with top substrate. Top goes over the edge band. Finish with flush or bevel bit. Use a good quality file to drawfile the edge to remove the wire edge. You will need the file anyway as the router bit won't get all the way to the wall, etc.
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This is what I have been reading, however, my buddy who says he has been putting laminate on museum displays for 30 years said that if I do it this way, due to the old top being removed and it not being perfectly smooth,the router bearing will waver and thiw will cause the edge band will waver and gaps will show. He says he always put the top on, then applied the edge tight to the top which was overhung a bit, then routed the top piece to match the edge band. Does this make sense?
R
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No offense, but if he is such a great buddy, why doesn't he do it for you? In my world, we call those types arm chair quarterbacks.
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He did offer to help me. This is my quandry. I don't want to offend him by suggesting that he is wrong, because I know he is a very good craftsman and the way he explained it to me made sense, but I just have never heard of anyone doing it that way. He also uses visqueen instead of dowel rods.
R

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On 8/4/2012 2:39 PM, Roanin wrote:

I wrote a good response that never made it.
If the substrate is gummy from the old adhesive, it will complicate doing the edgeband first and can make some sense to what your friend is telling you though I've not had huge problems with it.
Overhanging the top and running the edgeband to it can certainly work. It will require a straight and true cut with a good square edge to seal properly. The only way I know to get it is using a Virutex slitter which your friend may well have. YOu can get close with a really good blade in a table saw, but it is a bit of a dance if your pieces are long. It is going to take two or more to deal with a long chunk of edgeband and get it into postion against the previously installed top. You will need to mask the underside of the overhanging top or the excess glue will give you fits. I prefer the solid carbide tips rather than the ball bearing ones. If a bearing ever hangs it will burn the formica in a heart beat, especially if it is a light color.
I don't see a problem using visqueen though I've never tried it. I like to stick the center first and work each way. Make sure to pressure any joints if you have them. I have the slats from an old wide blade venetian blind that I like to use because it is easy to stack them to and from the job. They are sure getting harder to find.
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