Key broken off in Yale patio door lock... How to fix?

Hi, We have sliding patio doors and the key has broken and is now stuck in the main yale lock. I cannot remove the key. I cannot see how to remove the lock. This isn't urgent, it's been broken for months but with the summer coming up I thought I'd better get it fixed! Please can anyone advise on what I can do? Many thanks, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One option is to call a locksmith. While wearing my locksmith hat, I've pulled a lot of broken keys.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Instead of calling a locksmith, could the OP just borrow your hat?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sure, 7 3/4. Hope it fits OK.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have fished a few out with a dental pick. You can find sets of picks in catalogs and such. The picks are strong but flexible. You could also try a very fine, narrow coping saw blade. Just snip off one end near the teeth to remove the pin and slip it into the lock with the teeth pointing back towards you. When you pull the blade out, the teeth might catch the broken key and pull it out as well. YMMV.
Les
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Even if you get the key out, the reason it stuck may be a faulty mechanism that will just get the next one stuck.
Drill it out and replace the lock. The metals are soft; this isn't difficult.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or it may be simply that the lock needs a bit of lubrication.

That's just ridiculous. Get the key out, then lube the lock with powdered graphite, or graphite in oil. There's no need to replace the lock.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Golly Doug, is there anything you can't do?
I'm so impressed!
Electrical, plumbing, runoff/drainage calculations, roofing, window installation and repair, drywalling expert, gas piping expert, HVAC expert, appliance guru, political pundit, and now .... LOCKSMITHING!
You are my hero!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller writes:

I should have qualified, "given that getting the key out was not practical," which I expect is the case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 05 May 2005 23:37:48 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Kinch doesn't have the option of lubing the lock... He drank all the lubricants!
rusty redcloud
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why drill if your just gonna replace it anyways ???
Remove it and pull the cylinder....with the key still in it, all the tumblers are already in the proper position.
Should be a piece of cake.
--
SVL



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PrecisionMachinisT writes:

Fine, if it is indeed open. Sometimes the wrong key is what is stuck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5 May 2005 12:21:14 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I have several hemostat forceps I once bought from a hobby supply. They are normally used in surgery to clamp off blood vessels, but can also be used in such things as model making and woodworking. I use them occasionally when working on computers.
When a neighbor's key broke off in her door lock after she locked it, I was able actually to reach into the keyhole with the hemostat, turn the lock, and extract the key.
They make a good tool for this kind of situation. The hemostats are very narrow and tapered, extremely strong, and have tips that have a slight "gripper" filed into them. They also have a one-way lock built into the handle allowing you to clamp something and lock the hemostat onto it.
There are two kinds of hemostats, one curved at the tip and one straight. Here's what they look like:
http://www.tedpella.com/dissect_html/53096.htm
I can't recall where I bought mine, but over the years I've used them on various home repair projects many times where a needle-nosed pliers would have been too big. Good for getting broken lightbulbs out of the socket, fishing or pulling wire through tiny holes, picking up dropped nuts and screws from inside appliances and computers, bending computer parts slightly to fit, etc. Quite useful, especially the straight ones.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First, you shouldn't have posted this here. Try the locksmithing group instead. The people here are mostly hacks, not professionals or do-it-yourselfers who do quality work.
But if you just can't pull the lock, which you really should be able to do, just weld a piece of metal to the key and pull it out that way. A quick tack should do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sorry for posing in the wrong forum!
Many thanks for all the advice people ;)
PS. I am going to call a locksmith since the key is well and truly buried and I can't get a hold of it...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sheesh. Take the two screws loose that hold it together. Pull out the assembly. Take it to Home Depot. Take an extra key you have around if possible. If not, take another cylinder off. Home Depot will fix it for you and probably won't even have to replace the tumblers.
Then take the money you WOULD have used for a locksmith and take your family out to dinner. And a movie. And some frozen yogurt. And put what's left in your kid's piggy bank.
Rocket surgery it ain't.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 6 May 2005 07:32:35 -0700, "SteveB"

Probably the lock tumblers were sticky or worn such that the key stem acquired a small fracture that eventually broke inside the keyhole. That lockset might as well be replaced. Just drill out the keyslot. This will wreak the tumblers. That will let you rotate the assembly to unlock the door and position the assembly so that you can unscrew the whole lockset.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree. No locksmith would reccomend welding to a piece of key. Nor a quality DIY would reccomend that.
--

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Wow! Thank you so much for your expert insight.
I guess there are people here who aren't the sharpest knives in the drawer. You know the types I mean --- they can't wear a welding helmet without banging their nose, they don't know what to wear with their lavender flats or why new shoes chafe their ankle ... or they ask inane questions like "Do golfers HAVE to wear hats?" or "Why don't pro golfers have to replace their divots?".
Maybe do what we do, Julie. Cut people who are a little slow a little slack.
Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.