Is t1-11 hardboard or plywood?

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I've looked for a definition on the web and it seems that T1-11 is hardboard. But I've also seen it called plywood. Which is it?
I thought they were very different. Plywood is iiuc 3 or more layers of wood, where each layer comes from putting a log on a big lathe and taking off a continuous strip of wood, each layer deeper into the log for every rotation of the lathe. That's why one sees a repetitive pattern on plywood, because if that part of the tree is 16 inches in circumference, every 16 inches one sees a different level of the same branches, etc.
Hardboard otoh in wikipedia is described "Hardboard, also called high-density fiberboard, is a type of fiberboard, which is an engineered wood product. It is similar to particleboard and medium-density fiberboard, but is denser and much stronger and harder because it is made out of exploded wood fibers that have been highly compressed. Consequently, the density of hardboard is 31 lbs. or more per cubic foot[1] and is usually about 50-65 lbs. per cubic foot. It differs from particle board in that the bonding of the wood fibers requires no additional materials,[2] although resin is often added. Unlike particleboard, it will not split or crack. It is used in construction and furniture."
I think T1-11 is heavier than plywood of the same thickness. It seems to be hardboard. Right?
Thanks.
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mm wrote:

Hi, My cabin built in '97 used this material as exterior horizontal sidng. T1-11 is hardboard. Ours has natural wood color with grains Ver very hard. Driving nail on it is not easy. I used screws when I had to hang or attach something. It came with a 20 year warranty for color and still it looks like just installed. Better fire resistant than plywood as well,
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You are correct. Hardboard. I've never seen any plies so it can't be plywood. Ignorant people often refer to man made wood as plywood or plywood flooring as laminate even though it is not.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

MODERN t 1-11 is usually OSB with a layer of ply on the pretty side, or sometimes even a 'prefinished' plastic skin. REAL t 1-11, like we used back in the stone age, is indeed plywood. As a kid I humped plenty of it, in full 1/2" and 5/8" thicknesses. No idea if the real stuff is available any more, since I no longer swing a hammer for money.
-- aem sends...
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mm wrote:

T1-11 is either plywood or OSB (Oriented Strand Board) with grooves cut vertically to simulate wood planks. The term "T1-11" apparently refers to "Texture 1-11", a description of its appearance.
Plywood is, as you state, several layers of wood glued together. The grain is perpendicular in alternating layers, making the sheet very stable and resistant to size changes due to humidity.
OSB is "flakes" of wood glued together. The grain of the flakes is alternated in different layers to make the panel stable, similarly to plywood.
The T1-11 I've bought has been slightly lighter than the same thickness plywood because of the missing wood in the grooves.
Hardboard siding is available with pressed-in textures that look a lot like T1-11, but it's more fragile and more easily damaged by water. I once had a house with this type of siding, and it's a lot of trouble.
Trivia: Fiberboard comes in LDF (Low Density), MDF (Medium Density), and HDF (High Density). Pegboard is typically LDF, painted or hidden parts of cabinets is typically MDF, and Masonite is a common brand of HDF.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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SteveBell wrote:

Hi, Looking at my siding, there is no real wood in the material looking at the cross section.
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Tony Hwang wrote:

what's in there?
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wrote:

Wow, there was a lot more to this question than I thought there was. That's often the case. I'm glad I asked. Thanks, guys.
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mm wrote:

FYI - The botton of the door on my 25+ year old shed was rotted so I needed to replace it. A few trips to the home centers showed 2 products that looked similar. One was a hardboard but the other, the ONLY one actually labeled T1-11, was plywood which is what was on my shed. I purchased the latter. It is in fact plywood and matched the old one perfectly.
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on 8/10/2008 12:05 AM mm said the following:

Picture of T1-11
http://www.congdonlumber.com/plywood/images/t1-11.jpg
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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mm wrote:

As others have said, T1-11 is plywood. It comes in 3/8" or 5/8" thicknesses and either 4" or 8" wide options. Hardboard siding has been manufactured to look like T1-11, but it is in fact, hardboard siding with a finish "like" T1-11. Even Hardipanels come with a T1-11 finish, although they call it Sierra 8. That doesn't make it T1-11.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Robert Allison wrote:

OK. so what do you call the stuff on my house , a tract home built in 1971, which has siding that "looks" like T-111 but is definitely not plywood (like the other posters picture). It is some kind of composition I would compare to thick cardboard. If allowed to get wet, it swells like a roll of paper towels would. And it does not hold a screw very well at all.
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In forth:

Masonite
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On 8/10/2008 11:05 AM ChairMan spake thus:

Or, more generically, hardboard.
--
"Wikipedia ... it reminds me ... of dogs barking idiotically through
endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it.
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Here they offer an additional option to the 4 & 8" O.C. grooves, they offer it with a 12" O.C.
They also offer it in yellow pine, or fir, with fir being more expense.
24 years ago, I finished my place with 5/8", 8" O.C. fir. I have stained it twice. It still looks fantastic.
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By stained, you mean a "clear" stain that you can see grain through? if there is a grain.
Or do you mean pignmented stain, that these houses were done in, that seems an awful lot like paint to me?
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The first time I stained, I used a colored transparent stain. The last time, I used a solid stain. The transparent stain does not hold up to our Midwest elements as well as the solid stain.
When you say : "Or do you mean pignmented stain, that these houses were done in, that seems an awful lot like paint to me?" You very well may have paint, and not stain. I've seen pre-painted masonite, that's how it leaves the manufacturer.
I will never use exterior paint again. Exterior stain is the way to go. Stain will not peel or flake like paint, it appears to just weather.
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I know what I have. I have bought and used 8 gallons of it. It's called stain. I forget the rest of the name. It seems like paint in that the pigment doesn't soak in afaict. It stays on top.

Yes, it doesn't peel or flake.
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Kirby wrote:

If it is 12" OC, then it is not T1-11. That particular pattern is called Reverse board and batten. It will look like T1-11, but the spacing changes its designation. T1-11 is ONLY 4" or 8" OC. I am not trying to nitpick here, just educate.
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Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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You're about the only one to understand the properties and description of T1-11
Here are two of my T1-11 'pet projects; :
http://flickr.com/photos/joearnold/158621674/sizes/o /
http://flickr.com/photos/joearnold/158339277/sizes/o /
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