Is Rough Opening On The Same Plane?


I was reading the installation instructions for my ThermaTru entry door found at:
http://www.thermatru.com/pdfs/installation/InstallationInstruction.pdf
Besides the standard level, plumb and square checks, they also mentioned this:
*** Begin Stolen Text ***
Check to be sure the framing walls around the opening are in the same plane. Do this by performing a string test for plumb.
String Test for Plumb: Attach a string diagonally across the opening from the outside, as shown. The string(s) should gently touch in the center, if not the opening is out of plumb by twice that distance and needs to be corrected. Flip the string over itself to check both planes. Fix any problems now.
An out of plumb condition is one of the most common reasons door units leak air and water.
*** End Stolen Text ***
It seems to me that the same check should be done for windows, but I never saw this mentioned in any window installation instructions. I know that besides checking the opening we should also check the window/ door itself before (and after) cranking down on the mounting screws, but I've never seen this "Same Plane" check mentioned before.
Thoughts?
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DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

What's to thought about?
--
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Happens more on doors because the bottom is "open". Windows are part of the wall on all 4 sides. I was taught to frame a door by leaving the sole plate in the door space until the wall is nailed in. Then come back and cut it out at the door rough opening. But not everyone does that.
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re: Windows are part of the wall on all 4 sides.
But the sides of the rough opening could still be on different planes.
re: Then come back and cut (the sill plate) out at the door rough opening
But the sides of the rough opening could still be on different planes.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

Once you have framed and sheathed awhile, a crooked wall just looks wrong to you. A four-foot level, a ball of string, and a couple mason's corner blocks, can be very useful. Once roof is on, and sheathing on, but before doors and windows go in, make sure the corners are vertical, and stretch a string over corner blocks at bottom, midpoint, and top of adjacent corners. Pocket rule or a practiced eye will quickly point out any wall bulges and dips, while you can still fine-tune reality and flatten them out. With good framers that aren't in a hurry, it is seldom a problem. One of many reasons I'll never knowingly buy a McBuilder house. I want work done by people more worried about quality than speed.
-- aem sends...
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On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 08:16:05 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

This is the first time I've read about performing a "String Test for Plumb". I'll ponder this one :-/
Even with expensive Andersen doors, it is/was not in the install instructions.
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Oren wrote the following:

Me either. I suppose they mean 'square'. Horizontal is level Vertical is plumb. BTW. The symbol for lead is PB, which is short for the Latin word plumbum. Plumbing, plumber, plumb and plumb-bob all derive from the Latin word, since most plumbing was lead based in early history.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

Maybe the string test is to check for "Kitty wampus" of the RO or "catty-corner" of the wall :-/
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