Installing a manual transfer switch

I'm considering having a manual double-throw transfer switch installed on the main service to my house so that I can use a largish generator to power the whole shebang if I want.
What's typically involved in such a project? Professionals will be employed to perform the work, so I really shouldn't care and let them worry about the details, but I've always been curious.
Does the power company have to come out and pull the meter to cut power to the house, or can the electrician do that? I gotta believe somebody at the power company needs to be involved as the meter box has a seal on it.
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That all depends upon the rules of your power company. I deal with two power companies in NY. Typically we electricians are responsible to make all disconnects at houses. If it can be done at the meter, one company uses a number tag which we clip, pull the meter, then call in the tag number, the other company has a case hardened , locked ring, which takes an act of congress, paperwork, and hours of wasted time to have removed, in which case we cut the overhead and reconnect when we're done. Any lines that can only be disconnected at a pole or in a transformer vault, have to be done by the utility co.
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

It depends on whether the meter needs to be pulled. Some disconnect switches simply attach inside the breaker box and do not involve the main distribution lines.
Typically, the power company will come out, break the seal, and record the meter reading. In my town, they will perform that service within four hours of it being requested. The electrician then pulls the meter when he needs to do so. After the electrician performs what's known as the "smoke test," the power company is called and, in the fullness of time, comes out, replaces the seal, and takes another meter reading.
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On Jan 13, 8:14 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Manual switch was in the transfer panel that I had electrician install for my generator. I had a main panel upgrade at the time and electrical contractor took care of all dealings with the power company including final inspection. Switch to power house with generator through transfer panel is attached to switch that cuts off power from panel so that electricity will not be sent out of house to electrocute power company employees working on downed lines.
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Frank wrote:

That's not likely to happen. The load of the other houses on your road will blow your generator breaker.
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wrote:

So use a transfer switch so you do not blow your generator breaker! Although injuries and deaths from backfeeding are not likely to happen, they can and do happen. All electrical codes require approved transfer methods for emergency generators for that reason. You can not assume that your home is still connected to any part of the electrical distribution system in an emergency situation. Your drop cable may be lying broken on the ground or in the trees, or it may be that yours is intact and everyone else's in the neighborhood is down. Many knowledgeable people do safely disconnect their service feed without an approved transfer system, but they do it at their own risk.
Don Young
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On Jan 13, 8:14 pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Prewired are easy to do, it took a friend 4 hrs to put in a 6 circuit Generac prewired, it took 4 hrs to do the exterior box, we had alot of wood to drill through. But if you have no experiance get a permit and get it inspected by the city. It only adds maybe 40$.
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

You can pull the meter yourself. Just call them after to re-tag it.
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I have pulled meters, for good reasons like a fuse broke off in its holder .
called duquene light the next morning they didnt care as long as I notified them
did you know some breaker mains have a lock out capacity, so either main or generator can power house but not both
its code approved might fit your existing service panel or it might cost less to replace your main panel with lock out ability
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