Installing a ceiling fan in a light fixture

There is a light fixture in my dining with 1 switch on the wall that I want to convert to a ceiling fan (with light).
Do I need to redo the wiring?
If I have to hire a handyman, what would be approximate installation cost?
Thanks for your response.
SR.
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newbee wrote:

This is an easy DIY (a simple google search on ceiling fan installation will give you a lot of help). The biggest issue is ensuring that you support the fan properly. The big home stores sell special electrical boxes designed for supporting ceiling fans. The boxes have supports to connect to the ceiling joists.
Past that many fans these days come with remote controls. When I did this exact thing in our bedroom, I purchased a wall switch (http://www.hunterprestige.com/prodSum.php?pid 6&pTypec&sType0) that remotely controls the fan and the light. There was no need for additional wiring. The switch is expensive, but it saved me running an additional line. Note that the switch requires a 12 volt battery (like the ones in garage door openers).
Of course if you're scared of working with electrical stuff, I'd hire it out. If you want an approximate cost, call a handyman and ask what he charges.
Doug
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as the above pointer noted...it's well within the ability of a DIY'er
All you need is a black / white / ground.. Some older systems do not have a ground wire.
There are Fan Rated Electrical Box units available.. Do NOT attempt to hang a fan on a standard outlet box !!!
Having access from above helps a little, but is not crucial.
Two ways of controlling the fan...and light. You can use the pull chains for both fan and light or use the wall switch to control the light and use pull chain to control the fan, i.e. leave light pull chain always on and use wall switch to turn power on and off, while using fan pull chain to control fan.
Or you can control both fan and light by remote control replacing the wall switch. Remote control unit is self contained. At the wall switch connect the switched hot wire (normally black), to the feed hot wire... again black...(connect both black wires together with a wire nut so that ceiling box is always hot. In the ceiling box...connect hot and neutral to the remote control receiver and then the hot, neutral and light outputs of the receiver to the fan wiring. Test the operation completely before reassembling the fan shroud and blades because sometimes those antenna's can be real picky.
HD has the bracket for about $10. and also carries a wall box mounted remote control unit by Hampton Bay for about 30.00
Remember to turn power off at the circuit breaker when working on the switch outlet.
Home Depot was quoting a price of around $150.00 plus parts to install a ceiling fan.
You didn't list your level of comfort with working on electrical circuits. If you've replaced switches / outlets / lights etc then you probably have the required tools available. If not, you might wish to have it professionally installed. If you still want to go ahead, remember to test power to outlet after shutting off the breaker (or switch) to CONFIRM that the circuit is dead !! Lights and receptacles in the same room frequently are on different circuits. Avoid surprises, always recheck for power at the box you are working on.
hth
Peter
hth
Peter
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newbee wrote:

The cost of your handyman's work will depend on whether he does the work safely. He is unlikely to be insured. If he burns down your home your insurance may or may not cover the loss depending on what they believe about your role in acquiring unlicensed electrical work without a permit. The installation done by a licensed electrical contractor will cost between fifty and one hundred and fifty dollars depending on market conditions were you are and on whether the existing electrical outlet box is suitable for fan support.
Quality can be illustrated in the purchase of oats. If you want nice clean fresh outs you must pay a fair price. If you will be content with oats that have already been through the horse you can pay slightly less.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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On Fri, 11 Aug 2006 14:46:33 GMT, "Tom Horne, Electrician"

Many electricians are now charging over $100 an hour. Expect to pay about #300.
That's why we say we enjoy doing it ourselves.
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This is an easy DIY job. The wall switch can be left under the remote control unit that sits in a caddy. The remote works by wireless communication with the fan itself, but keep the old wall switch under there for a power on/off that you don't normally use (nor want to use). The instructions on the fan will explain all this. There's a Home Depot sale in fans right now, I think. Just make sure the unit you purchase comes with a remote control, otherwise you'll want to invest in this accessory separately. The remote won't switch the direct of the fan, forward or reverse, so this will have to be done by a switch on the fan unit itself.
newbee wrote:

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