How to you replace broken glass in a vinyl window?

Good morning,
Last week I think some of the neighborhood kids went wild with their pellet guns.
The result was ....I now have a broken second story window. No one fessed up and insurance is saying it's my baby with $500 deductible.
How do you remove the vinyl trim from the inside without damage? I assume this trim snaps in somehow and can be removed. I poked around with a screw driver but decided I should ask a few questions before I screw it up.
I would like to do this myself...... repair guy is talking $ 300 to 400 to replace the entire window. He says the double pane can't be removed must replace the whole thing (remove, replace, drywall & repaint).
I think this is bull........worse it took 4 phone calls to get the guy to look at it and another 4 so far to get a response (he said he wanted to talk to the original installer). We phoned the original installer and they gave us this guy to do the repair. All of this smells seriously wrong (rip off in the making)
Any tips and information would be greatly appreciated given I'd like to minimize my out of pocket costs.
Please reply to the group and Thank you in advance.
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what type of vinyl window is it, double hung, picture, casement and is it welded or a mechanically fastened window. IF it is a welded double hung I would just ask the original installer to oreder you a new sash. the price for that should be about 50-100 depending on size and you can put it in your self.
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That only works if you know who made the window, if they are still in business, and if they still make that style using the same extrusions.
That is why I would never purchase welded vinyl windows, because you are trapped. If you cannot get an original replacement, and thermopane glass does not always last more than 10 years, you have to buy another window unit, which means a style change and damage to mouldings, paint and decorating each time.

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In most vinyl windows glass is not replaceable. You must order the entire sash, which is easy to replace. Problem is only a sash from that manufacturer will fit. Since most of these units are custom sizes you also need to know the window size. If you know the original installer it would be a lot easier to have him order you a new sash.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/How-to-you-replace-broken-glass-in-a-vinyl-window-575347-.htm Olcooter wrote: Hi. I also have a double-hung double-pane vinyl window with the interior pane broken. Andersen Craftsman, I believe. Assuming that eventually I'm going to have to bite the bullet and replace the whole dang sash ($90 + 3 weeks), I don't see any harm in first trying to replace just the broken pane by myself. I mean, I can't break the window any more than it is already right?
I was just wondering if anyone had any insight on doing this. I've gotten the vinyl exterior trim off with some difficulty, so now the Insulated Glass Unit is exposed. This consists of the two panes and the sealed space between them. Now I'm struggling with how to pull it out of the sash. It's either epoxied into the sash, or just wedged really tight. Also considering trying to pull just the exterior pane off the IGU. But, it's caulked on to the IGU frame pretty well.
My vision is that I'd be able to pull the IGU out with the square portion intact (and perhaps the exterior pane unbroken), replace the interior pane, then reassemble. Any advice?
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wrote:

locally in pittsburgh pittsburgh window and door are great. take in window unit by 8am pick it up after 3pm. pretty cheap too.
normally double hung windows are removed by tilting the moving part a lot and pins then clear the assemblies that hold them.
sliders just lift out with care.
sealed units must be replaced by a new sealed unit.
pittsburgh window and door are experts at getting the sash off the glass. normally sash is screwed together but the screws can get welded in place. however they get it apart is beyond me bu they do it constantly.
I suggest you call smoe local glass companies to find one that does this in your area.
Window glass breaks and so windows are designed to be disassembled
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On Mon, 04 Jul 2011 15:54:12 +0000, Olcooter

strip removed.
I'd get a replacement SU, as replacing one pane on the SU is difficult and not terribly effective (you usually end up with moisture/condensation problems).
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Olcooter wrote the following:

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/How-to-you-replace-broken-glass-in-a-vinyl-window-575347-.htm

Original message date December 12, 2004
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Mon, 04 Jul 2011 15:54:12 +0000, Olcooter

More plastic garbage...... You couldn't give me a plastic window !!!!
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On Jul 20, 3:15am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

they are actually very nice and plastic is a good insulator. my vinyl windows are over 15 years old and still in good shape. plus they were affordable:)
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On 7/20/2011 6:30 AM, bob haller wrote:

Talk to me in another 35 years or so, and tell me how they are doing. Absent abuse, a residential window should last at least half a century, IMHO, and I have seen well maintained ones that made century mark or longer. Only place I would even consider vinyl is down south, like where my other house is, where the climate rots concrete. Ordinary wood windows do not do well there. I could see UV-resistant vinyl cladding on the weather side over a good wood frame, but vinyl is not a structural material, no matter how many box sections and ribs they figure out how to add to the extrusion.
--
aem sends...

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The wooden windows on the house I'm in were about 50 years old when they needed replacing.
The vinyl replacements are easy to clean, look great, don't need painting, and actually keep the cold out.
I'd settle for 35 years but I'm guessing much longer.
--
Dan Espen

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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com writes:

I love my plastic windows.
To the OP, contact the manufacturer. I had some windows crack in a vinyl garden window. Since they just cracked on their own, replacement panes were free. I installed them myself too. Not that hard.
--
Dan Espen

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replying to Stanky, doug wrote:

There is a video on you tube .for repairs to vinyl windows.i am currently doing just this repair myself..is not to difficult to do .you do you nessesary have to stay with low e glass.
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