how to run electric to island in basement

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On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 07:40:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Smurf tube being ENT, the flexible blue sutff
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I like your smurf tube name.
ENT seems pretty fragile. Seen significant problems?
--
bud--

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wrote:

Smurf is really pretty tough. It can be used anywhere you can use Romex plus embedded in concrete.
As an "unelectrical" anecdotal study, I am also using a piece of 3/4" smurf to sleeve the steering cable on my boat. 12 years later the Florida sun, salt water and heat have not hurt it a bit. It didn't get hard and crack as I suspected it might. Carlon must have some U/V protection in it. I personally think the listing may be somewhat conservative.
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On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 18:35:37 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A word of warning for Smurf tube. Pulling the wire can be harder. I wouldn't use 1/2" unless it is really short run. Don't bend it unless you have to. You can't put more than 360 Deg bends between junction boxes. I would pull the wire before I covered everything up.
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wrote:

Carlon would disagree with you on that. I was in a meeting with a number of building officials and the carlon rep. He presented data that suggested you could "push" wire through 720 degrees of bend and said they were trying to get the rule changed. What he did say is you have to support the ENT at both ends of every bend and pull the straight parts straight. If it is loose it will "belly" and bind the conductors. I would agree the extra buck for 3/4 is probably worth doing though. Once that raceway is in the concrete, you don't want to be chipping it out again because your plans changed. It would also allow you to exploit a loophole in the low voltage rules. If you pulled a "cable" like Romex, UF or better MC through there you could also pull in a CAT5 since cable jackets are "separation".
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writes:
| wrote: | | >A word of warning for Smurf tube. Pulling the wire can be harder. I | >wouldn't use 1/2" unless it is really short run. Don't bend it unless | >you have to. You can't put more than 360 Deg bends between junction | >boxes. I would pull the wire before I covered everything up. | | Carlon would disagree with you on that. I was in a meeting with a | number of building officials and the carlon rep. He presented data | that suggested you could "push" wire through 720 degrees of bend and | said they were trying to get the rule changed. What he did say is you | have to support the ENT at both ends of every bend and pull the | straight parts straight. If it is loose it will "belly" and bind the | conductors. | I would agree the extra buck for 3/4 is probably worth doing though. | Once that raceway is in the concrete, you don't want to be chipping it | out again because your plans changed. | It would also allow you to exploit a loophole in the low voltage | rules. If you pulled a "cable" like Romex, UF or better MC through | there you could also pull in a CAT5 since cable jackets are | "separation".
Just to be clear: you aren't saying that this "loophole" is unique to ENT, are you?
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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Go wireless Build a Tesla coil or buy a microwave setup.
http://www.thinkgeek.com/stuff/41/wec.shtml http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_energy_transfer
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Perhaps a nice little decorative column from the ceiling down to the bar. Could have an outlet in it. Two columns may make it look more better.
s

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On Dec 11, 7:29 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

use existing stripper pole? :) appliances require being directly plugged in to a properly wired outlet. you might be happier with a tv on the wall and a self-service wet bar. this removes the square footage wasted by the bartending and adds it back to the main room for the pool table. check the sump pumps that are city water-powered to protect your new remodel. i would rethink that missing sink before your first drink spill unless the laundry washtub sink is right there. plenty of homework available free at: http://www.buildingscienceconsulting.com/resources/default.htm
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2007 04:29:25 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

They make a flat cable that you can lay under carpet or a rug. You might look into something like that.
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Romex (type NM cable) is not allowed in wet locations or embedded in concrete [see NEC article 334]. Buried is considered a wet location, whether in conduit or not [NEC 300.5(D)(5)]. So you can't use Romex, even within conduit.
You could use type UF, which is rated for direct burial, but it is not rated for embeddment in concrete. So you would need to sleeve the UF in conduit where it would be passing through the concrete [see also NEC 300.5(D)(1), perhaps].
Cheers, Wayne
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