How to repair water rotted windows


I'm new to this group, so I apologize in advance if there is a post already done on this ( I couldn't find it).
My husband is not able to help with this project due to a disability, but my house windows on the back side & some on the front side at the bottom corners, I noticed, have turned brown and black and some have holes in it.
When I poke my fingers in it, the wood is hollow. I suppose it's water damage which has rotted out the inside of the outside window sill.
I would like to replace them and want to do it myself to save money; however, I cannot find any step by step instructions showing me how to do this. Also I'd like to ensure that the windows were properly installed to begin with, such as a flashing etc.
Can anyone offer any assistance.
Thank you, Billie Goodman snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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Billie,
Your local library will have some books on home improvement and carpentry. You'll need the right tools and a helper.
Dave M.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:,

and/or exerience. I agree that a good book will have detailed instructions. For now, use a prybar and take off the trim on the inside. This will allow you to measure the size of the old window and opening. You will want to buy or order you windows as soon as you are sure they are to be replaced. You could go ahead and purchase the window right away so that they will be in hand when you are ready to remove the windows.
That said, windows are usually installed from the outside and are therefore removed from the outside since most windows have a flange that extends over the edge of the opening and possibly underneath the siding. You have to use proper flashing to insure that your new windows won't have the same prob a the old. Used to be aluminum was used but now this sticky backed "water and ice shield" seems to be preferred. The other thing is that you have to make sure that the windows are plumb and level which is done with a level and wooden shims.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Billie-
This is the product that I have used in the past with great success
http://abatron.com/cgi-bin/shop/index.cgi?cart_idp82725.27139&pid 6
I just repaired about 30 window sashes & sills...only a few badly rotted I used a quart kit.
A quart kit will replace about 50 cubic inches of rotted wood; 5" x 20" x 1/2" thick
also checkout
http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/education/seminars.htm
a little way down the page on the right hand side is a click thru slide show of a window repair
John's website has a wealth of information
http://www.rotdoctor.com/products/product.html
An epoxy system is the way to go but you've got to be somewhat handy & organized. If you've got lots of rot (great volumes) ; wood replacement is prorbably faster & cheaper.
I restored the rotted corners of a single lower sash without removing the glass...I worked around it. If I had had l many windows I would have just remade the parts in new wood & replaced them but with epoxy I was able to do one faster than setting up & making the single part.
Bondo doesn't hold up very well....I did Bondo & it failed in a about a year, I've used epoxy 20 years ago & it's still good.
I did a search on the group that might help you
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/search?hl=en&group=alt.home.repair&q=rot+window+repair&qt_g=1&searchnow=Search+this+group
cheers Bob
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