How to remove glue from glass table

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I own a glass table with metallic lower part (legs etc). The top glass plate is attached to the four metal rings with some powerful transparent glue. Therefore, when you're watching the table you can actually see these metal rings and the table's lower metal parts through the top glass plate.
I badly need to remove the top glass plate, but don't know how to dissolve this glue. Does anyone know which glue is usually used for this purpose and what can be used to dissolve it?
I tried acetone, but it doesn't have any effect.
Thanks in advace!
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Is it possible that what you are describing as glue is actually clear silicone caulking? Is it pliable? If so, you can probably cut the top loose with a sharp knife.
If it isn't clear silicone caulking, I don't have any suggestion for you, other than to try different solvents - start with water and go from there.
HTH
Donna
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Honestly, I don't know if it's clear silicone caulking. I have very little knowledge when it comes to adhesives. But, it's not pliable. The top glass plate is firmly attached, and it can't be moved even with great force.
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On 7 May 2007 12:33:12 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I would at least try a hair dryer. Maybe some heat will soften it up.
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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wrote:

too much heat, and you'd probably crack the glass. i'd be really careful doing this.

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On Mon, 7 May 2007 12:53:42 -0700, "charlie"

I would guess the metal would draw most of the heat, little as it would be with a hair dryer. Tempered glass should not crack under this heat, unless I'm wrong. The table should be tempered glass?
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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why do you want to take it apart, the glass may not be removble being part of the structure of the table.
might take a photo to a local glass shop
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wrote:

dining tables are almost never tempered. in years of cutting them up, i've never encountered one.
the metal is not touching the glass (it has the glue/plastic/whatever in between), so won't draw out any heat.
tempered glass resists heat better than non-tempered. a hot pot on a non-tempered glass table will crack it. a hair dryer would easily reach the temps of a hot pot. the problem is localized heat differentials setting up stress points in the glass. if you could raise the heat across the complete sheet at the same time, this wouldn't happen. if the glass was scratched where you're heating it, it would be even worse, as the scratch will locally lessen the strength.

regards, charlie http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
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single edge razor blade
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's likely a cyanoacrylate glue (aka "super glue").
Methylene chloride disolves it, but watch out how you use it, it's toxic stuff!
Nitromethane works, but is a little less effective as a solvent, though less toxic.
You might try inverting the table and building modeling clay dams around the legs, then pour some solvent into the moats and wait for it to work.
Do that OUTSIDE please, for your body's sake.
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
  Click to see the full signature.
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replying to secretivelad, KP wrote:

I have the same table and also want to remove the metal rings. Where you ever able to get the metal pieces off the glass? What did you use?
Thanks.
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propane torch and long handled putty knife
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KP wrote:

Another antique post from the homeowners hub site. This one only 6 years old. Check the sig line at the bottom of your post.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
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Or Ronsonal lighter fluid and fishing line.
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replying to secretivelad, KP wrote: I tried water, Goo Gone and, 99% Isopropyl Alcohol and none worked. I hesitated to use a touch in fear that the glass would crack. My glass is 3/8 inch thick. In a matter of 1 minute and a soldering torch, all four metal rings were off. Yippee. Thanks for your suggestions.
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Did you torch the metal or the glass? I am afraid it's gonna crack a part... To worry about the glass but don't want to get hurt
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com posted for all of us...

Is it glue or a body fluid? Ebola? Try licking. Paging Monica.
--
Tekkie

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On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:34:51 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Are you talking to me? Are you talking to me?

Neither. It might crack a part.

Use a razor blade in a razer blade holder. Or a v. small screwdriver, or a dental pick. How much glue you got on there?
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@bigfoot.com says...

I didn't see the beginning of this post, but it sure sounds like a razor blade is the tool for this job. Unless there's something critical I missed (in which case, feel free to ignore me).
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 19:53:05 -0500, Mike Hartigan

I quoted everything that was there. I dno't know who "you" is.
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