How to recharge new NiCad battery

How to recharge new NiCad battery I bought a new 18 volt cordless drill-driver that has 1200 mAh recharceable NiCad battery. What is the best way to get longest battery life out of it? Alzerimers setting in? Can't remember if you completely discharge first or fully charge to get longest life.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why don't go to the Radio Shack web site and check if you can get the model
Webmaster
www.hostpupil.com
Database of Web Hosting Plans, Featuring Cheap Web Hosting Plans, Ecommerce Hosting, Dedicated Hosting
face=Arial size=2>...</FONT></DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; How to recharge new NiCad battery<BR>&gt; I bought a new 18 volt cordless drill-driver<BR>&gt; that has 1200 mAh recharceable NiCad battery.<BR>&gt; What is the best way to get longest battery<BR>&gt; life out of it?<BR>&gt; Alzerimers setting in?&nbsp; Can't remember if you<BR>&gt; completely discharge first or fully charge to <BR>&gt; get longest life.<BR>&gt;</FONT></BODY></HTML>
------=
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Completely discharging just about any multicell battery will reverse charge some cells and likely ruin them. Fully charge it. Try reading the instructions to be sure.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What kills nicads is over charging- getting it hot and over discharging when running, when the drill start to slow its dead, let the battery rest a day inbetween charges, just charge it and use it. Im sure your new charger wont over charge it it monitors peak level.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

Use it frequently(use it or lose it),recharge after use. Don't put away a disharged battery. Use a fast charger,1 hr lor less,not those 3-5hr chargers. Use a "smart" charger that doesn't overcharge the pack.
also,RTFM.
Note NiCd cells have a self-discharge rate;they slowly discharge just being stored.(thus "use it or lose it")
(1200mAH seems kinda low,most packs are 2200mAH or better)
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fast charger more likely to electrolyze the water in the cells. Thus killing Them.
Smart chargers better. Slow chargers better.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There is no water in nicads, stormin..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, there is. The electrolyte in a NiCd cell is potassium hydroxide in water. In the typical NiCd cell, there's not much - hence the concern about burning up what little there is to begin with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you for ammusing Ransley for us.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are peak reading slow chargers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fast charger knows when to shut off,slow chargers don't. Fast charger detects when time to shut off based on state of charge,slow charger has no idea of state of charge of cell,nor does the operator when setting any added timer. Smart chargers best,but they all charge FAST at first,then slow as needed depending on programming and type of charge measurement.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In my experience, new NiCads generally are sold in an uncharged state. Simply put the new battery in the charger and give it the normal charge procedure.
SJF
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your getting a bunch of different answers, so here's mine: Its been my experience that store bought chargers have one object in mind, to charge the battery fast. They really don't care if your battery dies a year from now. I've had store bought chargers that actually get a battery hot when its charging. I've thrown out my store bought chargers or modified them to charge at a reduced rate. Always start with a discharged battery (don't charge a battery that doesn't need charging) and put it on a timer so you know how long its been charged. I too have just gotten a couple new 18v drills with 1200 mah battery's. These are the first cordless drills I've owned. The charger said to charge for 5 hours and I measured a charge rate around 350 ma. Do the math: 5 hrs at 350 ma = 1750 mah into a 1200 mah battery. Not too bad, but I modified mine with a 13 ohm resistor to get the charge rate down to around 200 ma and will charge them for 8 hours (beacuse I just happen to have a nice 8 hour timer). I'll keep one of the chargers un-modified and use it to quick charge if necessary for an hour or two, but the 8 hour one will be what I use most of the time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you all. I had a Robi 12v drill/driver with two battery packs. One pack died and the other didn't seem to hold a charge long at all. Heck, I got the new 18 volt NOName for $9.99 after rebate. Now to see if I can make it last longer than I have left (65).
Dan K wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which is best for them. Those slow chargers don't measure battery temp or any parameter;they are just current sources,and can overcharge or undercharge your battery pack.Uusally overcharging them,shortening their life.

Which is normal,if not overdone.

How do you know how long to charge it? How do you determine the pack's amount of depletion? Modern smart chargers(all fast chargers) measure deltaV/deltaT,and know when to shut off the charge.

When you buy the new Lithium-ion packs,they will have their smarts built right into the pack,to insure the proper charging.
BTW,the cheapo drill/drivers are the ones that come with 3-5hr chargers,that shorten battery life,and good battery packs have mAH ratings of far more than 1200mAH. That's puny for a sub-C cell.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have read that fast charging definately costs battery life. You are right that uncontrolled cheap slow chargers can damage the batteries. A quality "slow" charger should be best in my understanding.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You were right. The charger for my dying 12 volt Robi was marked 17v. Plus I always left the battery in the charge between uses. Hopefully, I'll get better life from the new one with careful charging proceedures. Dan K wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

You *have to* charge the cells at a higher than rated voltage,you don't charge a 12V pack with a 12V supply. Typical charge V for NiCds is 1.55V per cell. Measure some good packs that are fully charged,you will find that they read higher than 12V.(my Makita 9.6 packs charge to ~10.4V)
That's why you want a smart charger or a fast charger that actually monitors the pack,not the slow chargers that are just a simple current source with no feedback control.
You NEED a timer shut-off if you use a slow charger,to prevent overcharging,and then the charger may discharge the cell if left connected,it depends on the charger circuitry.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.