How to inflate a wheelbarrow tire?

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I went to use my wheelbarrel for the first time in a year or two and the tire was loose on the wheel.
Is this something that can be fixed? There doesn't seem to be anything, except air pressure, to hold the tire in place.
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Does it have a valve to allow you to add air ???
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There is a valve in the wheel (not the tire), but the tire is loose on the wheel and all the air will just come out between the tire and the wheel.
All I have is one of those little 12v air compressors; but if no one has a better idea I will borrow a big compressor and see if the incoming air compresses the tire against the wheel well enough to seal it off. That seems unlikely, but I have no other ideas.
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you need to put some soap and water on the bead part of the tire then put some rope in the middle tighten the rope and it should force the bead to touch the sides you need lots of air coming out to catch it need to have a clip on chuck to hold the sir hose on!
Wayne

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Toller wrote:

i have or had the same problem..go to a lawnmower shop and buy a tube for the tire and put it in and then inflate and never have to add air again in two years.. before it was always using a piece of rope with a stick to squeeze the tire to seal up the rim so the tire would inflate, but now it is not any problem.... i think it cost me about $12 for a tire, the whole wheel barrow cost me $25.00 about 30 yrs ago........
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Double check. Its probably a valve from an innertube inside the tire if its like most wheelbarrows
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Rudy wrote:

Not necessarily. He probably has a tubeless tire. The best solution to his problem is to put a tube in the tire. That's what I did to mine when it kept going flat and was difficult to get to seal when refilling.
Don
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the
wheel.
its
Before you put in a tube, feel around the inside of the tire to see if any pins, thorns, nails, or staples will present any rough points to the tube, or you will have the same problem again. Often in a lawn tractor, for instance, there are so many thorns and stickers that you can't get them all out, so the liquid tire sealer is the best approach.
Regarding seating the tire on the rim after the bead has broken:
I haven't done this myself, but have heard of it being done. Take out the valve core and squirt a few teaspoons of gasoline into the tire. Wait a minute, and light it with a match. The resulting small explosion will expand the tire to the rim, where a compressor might not put out the volume to overcome the leaks... I've heard that Mexican mechanics use this technique a lot, without problems. Someday I might try it......
Andy in Fink, Texas
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I knew someone would take about putting in gasoline sooner or later , I will bet you just get a fire. Its not the same as either-sterting fluid
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m Ransley wrote:

How about acetylene?
Best regards, Bob
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the
wheel.
its
All this falls in the life is too damn short category. If rest of wheelbarrow is intact, throw in trunk, and take to tire store that does tractors and stuff. Tire is likely dry rotted, since people that sell wheelbarrows and other garden stuff use cheapest tires on earth. For 20 bucks or so, they can put on a real tire, and even foam-fill it if you want(for more money, of course), and you never have to think about it again. Had them put 2 air-filled tires on my hand truck five years ago, to replace the east european originals that went flat monthly, and they are still holding air. Money well spent. Alternative solution- tractor supply place often has pre-mounted barrow tires at a decent price, if you can match the hub size, and get the rusty bolts undone.
aem sends....
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most wheelbarrows that I've seen do not have a tube.
Rudy wrote:

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Tubeless tire.....
Easier to remove the tire and take it ( or the whole wheelbarrow ) to the bigger compressor--you need to find one that has a big tank....cause that 50 cent coin op jobby at the gas station probly wont do it either.
--

SVL







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it will work. you just need someone to hold the tire on real tight to create the seal while you hit it with air. Most tire places will do this for free (or $1 - $2). I've used to have NTB do it before I bought my compressor.
Toller wrote:

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two and the

anything,
They call it a tubeless tire. Air does hold it in place.
Bob
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and if th erim has a slight defect, your local auto parts store should have a small can of rim sealer, or try your local tire emporium. An inner tube could work too.
Once the tire's seated it's easier to top off w/ a small compressor.

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That's how they work. I have seen a farmer wrap a cord around the tire tread to temporarily seal the rim while adding air. Look for a damaged tire, rim or valve.
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Toller said:

Run it over to the nearest place that 'does tires' and ask them to inflate it.
I had the same problem, and after a Net search and advice about using ropes, etc. it was easier to run it over to Belle Tire where they inflated it in a couple of minutes, no charge.
--
Pat K. ('someplace.net' is comcast)

Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced.
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Do this at your own risk, but it works.
Spray a little starting fluid, and I mean a LITTLE into the tire, toss a match into it, POP, and the beads are against the rim and then fill it. Not responsible if you become a human candle.

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That Starting fluid trick is what an Expedition of 2 Toyota Landcruisers showed on tv with large maybe 40" tires. They were running down around 5 lb. It worked. You might have a little water or beer nearby for safety though. Now of course some goof will try gasoline.
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