How to build a room?

Out of these four characteristics which is most/least important when roughing in a bathroom? Plan to use 1/2" drywall (or drywall and beadboard) to cover the walls.
1. Plumb studs 2. Wall thickness consistent 3. Flat straight walls 4. Square corners
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IMHO, 1 & 3 will make installation of sheet material easiest. As long as the face of the stud wall is 'flat', the consistent thickness is not important. Square corners make installation of the wall finish easier, but can be finessed. T
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All are very important. A vanity (or similar cabinet) for example, installed on a crooked wall will have a nasty obvious gap at the back splash. A shower module or or tub shower enclosure will be a disaster to install in anything not square, plumb, or level. Even the flooring will be a PITA trying to get decent lines, and setting tile will be a nightmare of mismatched hard to cut bits and pieces. Considering some of the decent prices on lasers and such from Stanley (the Fat Max line) now, there's no excuse for not doing it right. And do yourself a favor, use the new non paper-faced wallboard and take advantage of it's compatibility with the bathroom environment. Every hour you 'save' taking shortcuts or skimping on the job will cost you double, triple or more trying to make things work. Good luck.
Joe
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wrote:

All are very important. A vanity (or similar cabinet) for example, installed on a crooked wall will have a nasty obvious gap at the back splash. A shower module or or tub shower enclosure will be a disaster to install in anything not square, plumb, or level. Even the flooring will be a PITA trying to get decent lines, and setting tile will be a nightmare of mismatched hard to cut bits and pieces. Considering some of the decent prices on lasers and such from Stanley (the Fat Max line) now, there's no excuse for not doing it right. And do yourself a favor, use the new non paper-faced wallboard and take advantage of it's compatibility with the bathroom environment. Every hour you 'save' taking shortcuts or skimping on the job will cost you double, triple or more trying to make things work. Good luck.
I agree. The shortcuts you take now during rough-in will consume more time during finish to compensate for. I would install cement board around the tub/shower area.
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On Sun, 9 Nov 2008 08:21:18 -0500, "John Grabowski"

No shortcuts here. With the toilet drain location fixed, the vent stack location fixed, and a shower alcove I have no choice to make a bowed wall, one with a slight jog in it or a wall containing vertical steps. The alcove area has been built per manufacture instructions (60-1/8" wide). I've decided to keep all the studs plumb all around, but still have a slightly curved wall (a 2" bow along 6 feet). No problem with flooring, although I'm sure I'll need to deal with the base and crown trim, probably less tedious than having a stepped wall.
Our other two tub/shower bathrooms have been used daily for 18 years and the walls are plain drywall. No wall damage due to the wall fan timer switch and bath/kitchen gloss paint. I plant to use the green drywall, which is slightly better.
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Plumb walls and square corners rate highest on my list. The other two will pretty much follow if you pay attention to these two. If your corners aren't square and walls aren't plumb installing a tub or shower will be nearly impossible. Besides, if you use straight and true 2x4s for your top and bottom plates and studs the walls should be a consistent thickness and flat.

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