how long should programmable thermostat batteries last?

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I think the setbacks work,it's just that the PEOPLE have a problem. (that the setback doesn't suit their preferences) No offense meant.

why would a heat pump work any different than my air conditioner? When the TS says it's too warm,my AC is turned on and cools my apartment down. The same goes for when I have 'heat' selected in the winter.
What is "hold mode"?
My TS has a +/- 2 degF window; when the room temp is within 2 degF of the setting,it is inert. When the temp goes outside the 2 degF window,either the AC or heat(whichever I have selected)turns on and runs until the temp is back inside the window.
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Jim Yanik
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My heat pump is on pretty much continuously at night, into mid- morning, in the winter. There just isn't the reserve to quickly raise the temperature. When it's cold the unit is pumping 40-50F uphill from 20something, which your AC isn't. The outlet temperature, on a good day is *supposed* to be 80F, or some such. I call the heat pump forced cold-air.

Sure, it's a matter of how fast. A heat pump takes *hours* to change the temperature a couple of degrees, hardly useful on a set-back.

Hold == Setback clock off (hold current temperature)

That's sorta what a thermostat is designed to do. ;-)
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Jim Yanik wrote:

It's not preferences, it's practicalities. When people are home the temp shouldn't be "set back".

They don't when in cooling mode, however they do when in heating mode. In heating mode it is normal for them to engage backup electric heat strips when the Tstat setpoint is raised more than two degrees. In heat pump heating mode the efficiency is high, but the ability to raise temps quickly is lower since the heat pump output temps are only around 80-105 degrees, not the 150+ of electric heat (or combustion heat).

Again, heat pumps are typically two stage devices in heating mode and operate at different efficiencies depending on which stage is operating. This is different from other types of heating systems.

Hold mode disables all setback programming and operates like a "normal" thermostat.

Hysteresis.
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wrote:

that IS a "preference" that some people like when they go to bed. It also saves energy when they aren't up and around.That's "practical".
Better thermostats have a 7-day program that allows setbacks during the workweek,and none on weekends when people are home during the day,no need to "hold" or override the setback. Mine doesn't,it's just a cheapie.

Basically,what you're telling me is that heat pumps are incompatible/impractical with setback thermostats. It seems more like a design problem with the heat pump(HP) system. If the HP is raising the temp,albeit slowly,one should be able to opt for no electric "boost" heat. All it means is that the circulating fan runs longer. I recognize there may be a point where the HP cannot supply enough heat when outside temps are very low,and thus backup heat is needed. But the system should be sized so that is a rare event.

Ah,on my TS,it's labelled "override".(overrides the setback)

Yup.
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Jim Yanik wrote:

Well, my new heat pump seems to do ok down to about 28F before it has to kick in the aux heat, so it's not that common here in N. TX. The aux heat with more than 2F setpoint change is a thermostat thing which seems to be standardized.
If you have good insulation, the setback period may produce little if any savings anyway.

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limited.usenetmonster.com:

<snip>
Pretty much what I've found with mine. AFAIK, they're not recommended.

If it takes three or four hours to recover, there's hardly a point setting the temperature back.
<...>
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Mine last all year, change them in the fall. I can't remember the brand of stat I use. It's actually a take out from another job. But, three months is far too fast for using up batteries.
Between R and C, you should have about 24 to 28 volts, and use the AC scale.
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anyone have the original installation instructions for their inexpensive "generic cheapie" thermostat? If so,I'd appreciate a copy emailed to me. I lost mine.
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Pete C. wrote:

Around here, all the HVAC supply houses carry a 5 conductor thermostat cable with red, white, yellow, green and blue wires. The color code to follow is no problem if you follow what's on the diagram on the air handler door (normal place). Heat pumps with multi stage heat and cool can be confusing if you don't go by what the manufacturer calls for. I get calls all the time from guys asking me how to hook up their heat pump thermostat. "What do I do with these 9 wires?" Is a question I get quite often and I tell them to look at the manufacturer's diagram and follow it so you or anyone else can service the darn thing. When me and my friends install a system, we make sure the paperwork is attached to the furnace/air handler where a service person can find it. The TBBE, The Big Brown Envelope seems to work best. For some reason, retards always tear the clear plastic stick on envelopes to pieces and leave the paperwork scattered around to get ruined. Gotta love lazy morons.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Chuckle. When I was a kid, my old man's HVAC guy would put TBBE either on top of the main cold air return duct, or on the inside of the hatch you open to change filters, if there was a safe place to wedge it. There weren't any stick-on clear plastic zipper bags in those days, of course....
If I do anything strange to the innards of any piece of technology, I always try to leave some sort of markings inside indicating what I did, for the next poor SOB in there. It may be me, it may be somebody else 20 years from now. Sharpies are great for that.
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aem sends...

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aemeijers wrote:

Yea, a little consideration. We put the paperwork for all the attached equipment in TBBE for the next one of us who goes out there. I do the same thing with telecom and data systems except I install a document holder on the backboard or on the wall in the IT/server room. Sometimes I need a small bookshelf for the manuals that come in binders. It's a lot easier to look up the information in the manual than to talk to an incomprehensible fellow in India. The is one very important step one should always remember: PUT THE GOLLY WIGGLE MOTHER RAPING PAPERWORK BACK WHERE YOU GOT IT YOU LAZY INCANDESCENT SPHINCTER!!
TDD
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You know, Dufas, you swear like one of them gosh dern Mormons.
Much the same, here. I do try to leave manuals and tech sheets with the equipment. Top of the cold return is good, if it's not all floor pan.
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Sounds like either the thermostat is defective, you had a bad batch of batteries or aren't storing the batteries in the best place to preserve their shelf life...
~~ Evan
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Evan wrote:

I store them in the plastic blister pack in the kitchen junk drawer ten feet from the stove against an outside wall. Never frozen, never above 75 degrees. I suppose they could have gotten skunked sitting in a tin can in a sunny freight yard somewhere, in the supply chain. No idea where the Duracell factory that supplies this part of the country is. I'll buy a fresh pack today with the longest date I can find, and try again. I'll also put a tiny post-it inside the case with the date, so I can be sure next time, how long it has been.
-- aem sends...
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Do you have a battery meter- gauge, Ive rarely-once in a while found one weak cell out of a bunch, one weak cell ruins a group to show dead in an apliance. Get one of those inexpensive cell testers that puts a load on the cell to mimic an actual load so you will have a actual reading of the worth of the cell, mine was maybe 7$ at radio shack. Once in a while I test a dead battery operated gizmo and find just one dead cell ruining the whole pack. I dont know what happens when a thermostat goes battery dead but I would hate to have the heat "Lock On" while I am away. I have saved alot of money and batteries by using a battery load teaster by not junking good batteries. Or the thermostat is defective, draining them, and needs replacing.
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On Sat, 17 Apr 2010 23:25:39 -0400, aemeijers

My Honeywell 7 day programmable with large backlit display needs new AAx3 cells every 8 months. It has a low battery indicator and although I've never let it go to where the batteries were completely drained, it retains its programming while you replace the AA cells. This model is about 10 years old.
You should probably replace what you have with a Honeywell.
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On Apr 18, 7:43am, Jeff The Drunk wrote:

I have a cheap "PerfectTemp" that uses one AA. The batt will last 3 yrs and not lose anything when changed.
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On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 05:58:13 -0700 (PDT), Bob Villa

Good for you. Here's a pat on the back a cookie and a cup of milk!.
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On Apr 18, 8:30am, Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Is it warm milk? Thanks!
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On Sun, 18 Apr 2010 08:43:06 -0400, Jeff The Drunk wrote:

My Honeywell 5+2 is on it's second or third set of batteries since the new furnace went in, back in Aug 2003. The current batteries are Ikea Alkaline batteries made by Varta in Germany.
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