How do I inflate a tubeless wheelbarrow tire that fails to seal

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Others have given advise about repair. In my case, I couldn't get any of those methods to work.
I called the manufacturer for instructions. They took my address and sent me a free replacement. Turns out the tire has a lifetime warranty. Bought the wheelbarrow at HD.
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On Fri, 27 Jun 2008 04:42:41 -0400, Irving Drinkwine wrote:

I find that when a small tire goes flat repeatedly it is better to remove the wheel and remove one side of the tire in order to pack the tire with rags, old foam padding from carpeting or anything that keeps the tire from going so flat that it comes off the rim and looses it's seal. Then in the future you can re-inflate the tire when you need it again. I have done this on lawn tractors, yard trailers that I pull with the lawn tractors, a four wheel wagon with pneumatic tires, and a wheel barrow. I don't use them all that often and sometimes when I do the tire is lacking air but is still drivable to the compressor and the bead seal is not compromised to add air.
I live in an area where we have sand spurs that are able to put extremely small holes in tubeless tires. I have cleaned the fix-a-flat remains out of tires and know this doesn't hold air for long.
By the way, I have made a hold down tool using all thread rod to hold a small tire tight to the top of my table saw to remove one side of the bead of the tire while I stuff it with rags. So far the rags have held up better on the lawn tractors but the foam carpet padding has worked ok on the wheel barrow because I store it up on it's nose with the handles against the wall so it never has any weight to collapse the tire when flat.
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That is a good Idea. Don't try this on a car or motorcycle tire though.............LOL Tony
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Several ways:
Buy a device you put around the tire and inflate with air. If fills up, contracts the tire so it makes bead contact, then inflate.
Make one out of a piece of rope and piece of mop handle. Put around circumference of tire and twist broom handle. Add air with a chuck that bites on the stem and stays there. Twist rope until bead makes contact.
Spray starter fluid at tire and ignite with Bic lighter. Resultant explosion will put bead onto rim and remove excess facial and eyebrow hair.
Use one of those ratchets to squeeze the circumference of the tire until it makes bead contact. If you can find one that short.
Or get one of the pull types that don't have the ratchet.
Steve
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The air is probably leaking past the rim, tire stores will smear a vaseline like substance along the bead to seal it up, I did the same at home and it worked. You can also replace the pneumatic tire with a solid one.-Jitney
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Irving Drinkwine wrote:

As everybody has said, you surround the tire with a band, much like Scarlett O'Hara's corset, and get Mammy to tighten it until everything pops into place.
My solution was to get a tube from Harbor Freight (about $2.00) and the problem disappeared forever.
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