Hovering Bumble Bees

I've got some big black not-very-fuzzy bees hovering about two fee off my rafter edges. Anyone know what that behavior means? They're quick, too, they dodge the spray can pretty well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bert Byfield wrote:

http://www.uky.edu/Ag/Entomology/entfacts/struct/ef611.htm
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Probably carpenter bees.
See also http://web1.msue.msu.edu/imp/mod02/01500558.html http://www.bugspray.com/article/carpenterbees.html http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-1056 / http://www.aces.edu/pubs/docs/A/ANR-1056/ANR-1056.pdf
They have a stinger but rarely sting unless provoked.
It's a long url, but roughly what it says is stick a moth ball in the holes and plug with plastic wood or something.
Unfortunately I iddn't read the url until after I plugged the holes, so I didn't use moth balls. It still got rid of them for several years. Some of the adjoinging townhouses have yellow dribbles, and I think some/all of that from after I had my bees. But my bees haven't come back, and no other bees have either.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've been watching a similar behavior, but I have one single "bumble bee" (big black one) doing it. He doesn't seem to be nesting, just flies by "buzzing" away and tags the wall along the patio.
Oren "My doctor says I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fiber, and that I am therefore excused from saving Universes."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bert Byfield wrote:

Carpenter Bees!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bert Byfield wrote in message ...

I believe they are Carpenter Bees and not Bumble Bees from the sound of it.
Cheri
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You have carpenter bees, not bumble bees. They drill holes about 1/2 inch diameter and 4 deep, lay their eggs then fill the hole with leaf cuttings and seal it up. later the egg hatches and the larve eats the leaves and emerges to become another bee. They do have a stinger like the bumble bee. Bumble bees nest in the ground though. Jack
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That is because GM and the other two US auto companies were more interested in continuing to make their old motors and not develop better ones. They FOUGHT to keep making the old stuff rather than develop modern motors.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 May 2006 15:30:52 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

Not a Biff nor Martin here, but we live in a coffee shack (single wall, and parts of this house are over 50 years old- certainly nothing fancy) and about those bees...late at night they get irritated with one another and start buzzing in the wood. Maybe it is the kids emerging form the pupa but I can hear them on the wood out our window. When we had our ho sue tented for termites years ago, we found many dead carpenter bees below the gutter line. We did not know we had so many. Wish we didn't.
aloha, thunder smithfarms.com Farmers of pure Kona Coffee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 12 May 2006 13:18:11 -1000, smithfarms pure kona

Call the police. They shouldn't be making noise after 10PM.
If they are *your* tenants, I'd give them a 30-day notice of eviction.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 May 2006 15:30:52 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@localnet.com wrote:

tennis or bad minton racket swating carpenter bees.......Aluminum baseballbats work good too, but takes more skill.........sounds like little rocks getting nailed.
=============================================Put some color in your cheeks...garden naked! "The original frugal ponder.."Since my statements are given freely, take em or leave em, I am entitled to my opinion none the less. My opinion and $1 is still only worth $1.....but I am entitled to "MY" opinion... ~~~~ }<((((o> ~~~~~~ }<{{{{o> ~~~~~~~ }<(((((o>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Possibly carpenter bees. Watch them. They may have already bored holes into the rafters to lay eggs. I have heard from several sources that they do not sting, although I'm not sure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nobody.com says... :) Possibly carpenter bees. Watch them. They may have already bored :) holes into the rafters to lay eggs. I have heard from several sources :) that they do not sting, although I'm not sure. :) :) The ones hovering about more than likely are males, which have no stingers, the females can sting.
Lar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I use to have the same problem, but with my deck.
It appears you have male Carpenter Bees waiting for a nested female Carpenter Bee to leave her next. If you have exposed bare wood, you might have a female boring a hole in it.
Might want to get professional help, since it isn't the males that are a problem, the females damage wood. I've taken care of my deck, but it is at ground level. I used a powder I inject in the holes. Kills the female, and any later investigating female Carpenter Bees.
good luck,
tom @ www.MedJobSite.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bert Byfield wrote:

These bees can be quite destructive to wood -- even treated lumber. They will eventually hollow out the board. I would suggest a thick coat of paint on the bottom surface of the wood to discourage them as they always bore holes on the bottom side.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They'll bore from the sides and top, too. Any wasp and hornet spray will kill them, then spray all exposed surfaces with a long lasting insecticide containing Cyfluthrin, such as Home Advantage at True Value or Demon at the Co-op. After all the bees have gone, fill the holes with Liquid Nails. Then paint the wood with an oil based primer and top it off with a final coat of oil based paint. After buying this house, it took me a year before I realized what they were and then a couple months to get rid of them. No problem after doing the above.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No they don't always. In my case and my neighbors' they made the holes on the side side, that is, the back side, facing the house, of a 2 inch high, 20 foot wide, almost one inch thick, "decorative" piece of wood that runs in front of the soffitt vents. I guess it's purpose is to hide the vents to some extent.
I actually never killed any of these things. I filled the holes, and they left. I had to paint over the drippings they had made. Maybe if I had gotten to them before they had finished their holes, it would have been harder to get rid of them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Our Hawaiian carpenter bees bore from the sides mainly. I can see several started holes on the treated & primed & stained wood, and hope they give that up soon.
aloha, Thunder smithfarms.com Farmers of pure Kona Coffee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
big and scary, one wanted to own our deck roof rafter a few years ago. i tried the usual attack with off spray and on another night with wasp nest spray about an hour after sunset. but if these are in your home's wall phone for an extermintor, they usually use nice effective odorless stuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My father used to keep an old badminton racquet hanging on a nail under the carport. Since they like to hover, they are fairly easy targets.
They did a lot of damage to the carport, so he got really fond of the satisfying "ping" they made as he fired them over the fence.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.