High Efficiency Furnace intake pipe does not go outside. Is that OK?

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replying to intersoft4you, HVAC Man wrote:

A high efficiency furnace should draw air from the same pressure zone ! Meaning the inlet air pipe and the exhaust air pipe should be in close proximity to one another allowing equal pressure changes. Both pipes should always be installed on the same side of the house as well. Whomever said you are allowed to to draw intake air from the basement is just looking to make some easy money on nuisance pressure sensor trips....
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HVAC Man wrote:

Hi, Mod mid-efficiency furnace haad fresh air insulated dampered intake duct for combustion. In this case intake can be inside the basement. Our local code allows this.
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On 2/17/2015 1:13 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

CAN BE does not mean SHOULD BE.
Using outside air for combustion is more efficient. You are using air that you paid to heat and sending it up the flue. Sounds to me the contractor for the OP is just lazy.
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On Tuesday, February 17, 2015 at 10:29:50 AM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The difference in heat may not be that great. One factor is where the furnace is located, ie is it in the heated space, an unheated basement, garage, attic, etc. Even assuming worse case, it's not clear to me how much difference it makes. Yes heated air is used for combustion. But the alternative, bringing in cold outside air, just means less heat is generated in the furnace. You're getting more heat of a furnace with 60F air going into it than with 20F air.
I know relatively new, circa 2007, expensive houses built here that have furnaces in unfinished basements that use the basement air.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hi, Any how, today's new houses are so air tight we have to bring in controlled outside fresh air into the house.
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On Tuesday, February 17, 2015 at 11:05:14 AM UTC-5, Tony Hwang wrote:

Maybe so, somewhere. But I've yet to see a new house that was so airtight that it needed it around here, NJ.
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trader_4 wrote:

Hi, In cold climate up here every new house going up has provision for fresh air intake. My house was built in 1994 per R2000 specs. If it doesn't bring in fresh air, it may cause indoor CO problem. Summer or winter, we seldom open windows.
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On Tuesday, February 17, 2015 at 12:53:12 PM UTC-5, Tony Hwang wrote:

Where is this CO problem supposed to come from?
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On 2/17/2015 11:57 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Backdrafting.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8806218
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On Wednesday, February 18, 2015 at 11:59:02 AM UTC-5, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

I guess it's possible. Can't see what the study actually consisted of without having paid access. The question would be what kind of appliances did these highly sealed houses have? You would think it would have a high efficiency direct vent furnace for example. That would eliminate the furnace as a possible force. What's left? WH? Again typical energy efficient new house likely has a power vent WH. It would be interesting to see the study to find out how the CO they measured originated if they are using modern appliances. With an old furnace using a traditional chimney, old non-power vent water heater, etc then I can see it being a problem, but those appliances in a new house seem unlikely.
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On Monday, February 16, 2015 at 11:44:06 PM UTC-5, HVAC Man wrote:

Nonsense. Many furnaces can be installed using either outside combustion air or inside. It's permitted per the manufacturer's installation instructions. In most cases it makes more sense to use outside air, especially if the furnace is located in a heated space, because if inside air is used, the makeup cold air will be drawn in to the structure from outside through leakage.
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On 2/17/2015 7:24 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Yep. Not only that, but some of the earlier high efficiency furnaces didn't even have an air intake pipe. I had an Amana, probably from the 90s, that had a standard open burner arrangement just like the furnaces from the 70s. I just drew air from the room where it was installed. The exhaust on the Amana, was the standard PVC out the side wall of the house.
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On Tuesday, February 17, 2015 at 8:30:13 AM UTC-5, Art Todesco wrote:

Not that it matters at this point, as this is a revival of an old post, but the install manual for the furnace would have the answer as to how it can be installed. My Rheem, it could installed either with outside air or using air from within.
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Same thing here. My two Heil furnaces never required outside air, the first running for 22 years, The current one running for 10 years. No nuisance trips or other issues.
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On 2/17/2015 10:03 AM, Smarty wrote:

Luxaire, installed 1994. No nussiance trips.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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Smarty wrote:

Hi, Ever done an energy audit to see how air tight your house is?
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On 2/17/2015 12:55 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Not really, Tony. My house was built in early 1950s and not especially tight even with my updates to windows, doors, insulation, etc. Very small square footage so the heating and cooling costs are pretty modest, and I never ask for especially cool or especially warm temperatures either. A couple grand a year pays for all my heating and cooling, hot water heating, and other gas appliance use.
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About 1320Sq ft plus 600 sq ft basement - heated with gas - never over $750 for heat and hot water - in central Ontario (where it was -36C over the weekend)
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wrote:

I have 2050 square feet on one level with the same in the basement. Both my furnace and water heater have an air intake from outside, but my gas bill is about $600.00 for a year for heating, water heating and cooking in a Toronto suburb. Don't ask about my electric bill.
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On Tuesday, February 17, 2015 at 5:06:44 PM UTC-5, Smarty wrote:

That doesn't sound so great. I have a 3100 sq ft house, my heating, cooling, hot water total is at least $500 a year less.
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