HELP! How catch dust in vaccuum when drilling wall?

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I want to catch the brick & plaster dust when I drill a hole in the wall at home.
I usually use my ordinary vaccuum cleaner (held by someone else) to catch the dust as I drill. It works really well. And it extracts and remaining debris in the drill hole which might prevent a wall plug going in.
However the brick & plaster dust block up the vaccuum cleaner's bag. Yes, it's one of the older vaccuum cleaners with a bag.
How can I fix up something which will trap the dust before it gets to the bag?
I was thinking of somehow using some filter material: perhaps a bit of densely woven fabric, or perhaps a square cut fro m an old vaccuum cleaner bag. Any other ideas of what material to use?
How would this best be secured? Do you think the best arrangement is to simply trap a piece of this filter material between the nozzle attachment and the vaccuum cleaner pipe?
Maybe there is something economical I can buy here in the UK to attach to the vaccuum cleaner to do this job. This Drill Mate product looks a bit elaborate for infrequent home use and I can't think it would trap enough of the dust. Does anyone have any experiences with it? http://www.mustget1.com/pages/drillmate.html
Any other ideas onhow to trap the masonry dust?
Maybe it is possible to somehow wet the brick with water to control the dust? Or something else? Use a handheld water mister spray on the drill bit while drilling?
David
-----------
PS: In the past I used a "ceiling cup" on the drill bit but it was not as effective as I would have liked.
I've also seen little plastic bag gadgets which you stick to the wall and drill into to catch the dust but these are too expensive.
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I usually hold get the better half to hold a dustpan against the wall catches most of the bits or http://www.ronhazelton.com/tips/Paper_Bag_Dust_Catcher.htm
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On 03 Mar 2006, Mr Fixit wrote:

I find that the brick & plaster dust goes further and wider than the dimensions of a bag. Maybe I a extra-sensitive to it because I might drill above my living room carpet whereas your interesting pictures show you using a workbench and workshop.
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David Peters wrote:

I don't know if you can find this there, but it's pretty simple so you could probably make one.
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@0508465851.1141419420@@@@&BV_EngineIDhladdheglilgecgelceffdfgidgin.0&MID76
Pete C.
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Pete C. wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@0508465851.1141419420@@@@&BV_EngineIDhladdheglilgecgelceffdfgidgin.0&MID76
I have taken a look, but can you narrow it down a bit please?
Dave
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Dave wrote:

It's a water pre filter for a shop vac. Intended for drywall dust which also clogs vacuums pretty readily. You should be able to make one from a 5gal bucket and a few fittings if you can't find the commercial one. Basically you have the intake come in under the water level and the exhaust to the vacuum just at the top of the bucket.
Pete C.
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On 04 Mar 2006, Pete C. wrote:

Is this it?
<http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/jsearch/product.jsp?pn162029>
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David Peters wrote:

Um, no, unless that link lost a digit or two. The unit I referenced is basically a bucket that goes in line between your shop vac and it's nozzle. The air and dust is brought through water in the bucket so most of the dust gets trapped in the water instead of clogging the shop vac filter.
Pete C.
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The link you posted contained a session id, which is a pretty sure sign that it won't work for anyone who visits the site atfer your session has expired. You need to post the keywords so we can do a new search.
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I saw a product at Lowes that was a round disc made of plastic baggy material with a slightly adhesive back. You mark where the hole goes, then drill through the plastic, and all the dust collects on the inside of the plastic thing.
When you're done you just remove the drill, peel the disc off the wall and toss it.
Unfortunately I can't remember what it's called. You might be able to find it if you ask someone in the power tools secton about it.
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Envelope. With a bit of masking tape attached. Works better if you poke the corners inside out first, so as to make it bulge outwards.
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On 03 Mar 2006, Andy Dingley wrote:

Do you make a hole in the envelope so that the masking tape sticks itself and the envelope to the wall?
Or should the masking tape be double sided to stick to the wall and the envemope.
But I'm still not clear quite how you use the arrangement. Could you or someone else give a bit more detail please.
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Why, are you so clueless ?
--
geoff

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On 04 Mar 2006, raden wrote:

Heh!
Maybe because I do not see myself as an expert DIYer who knows everything.
I think I saw the suggestion as clever than it really was. If it really is as over-simple as it perhaps seems then it's obviously not going to work for me as I find masonsry dust spreads. Catch it falling into an envelope? It's not made of large granules, you know.
Imagine drilling a hole above the skirting board for a phone socket with this approach. How is this envelope trick going to work in such a smal space? Please explain.
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But it's hardly rocket science, is it?
If someone points you in the right direction, work out the detail, or, can't you think for yourself ?

Well, it's worked for me, and I invented the technique along with thousands of others who saw a problem and an obvious solution
--
geoff

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On 05 Mar 2006, raden wrote:

I had thought the envelope trick was smarter than it seems and I thought it aimed to emulate a DustBubble buy formeing a sealed pocket of air inside the envelope with the drill bill poking through some part which was reinforced by masking tape. But it seems the envelope trick is effectively nothing more than an ashtray stuck on the wall under the drill bit.
I'm sorry to tell you that your technique (and seemingly that of thousands of others) to, er, catch the falling debris is just, well, it's not a technique really is it?
I might as well have someone hold a dustpan below the hole. At least the dustpan has a slightly wider catchment span than a typical envelope and the dustpan should be able to use your technique to even greater effect.
But of course you would realise that even a child of 14 would have considered catching the falling debris as the first option to try and so when I ask in my OP on how to trap the dust I'm not really talking about the dust which immediately falls to earth but the dust which can float on air currents and thermals. In this thread last Saturday John Rumm pointed out that we seems to be referring to two types of debris here. And I'm referring to what John calls the "sub-micron" dust. (Now don't get a microscope out and tell me it is actually five microns in diameter because I'm sure you know what that is saying!)
I once had plaster dust (as it happens, from a large part of a downstairs ceiling thanks to some workmen) travel up a flight of stairs and across a room and deposit itself quite noticeably. That's the sort of stuff I want to catch. And your open envelope ashtray trick just won't cut the mustard for this one.
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David Peters wrote:

Yup, now you are getting it!

Depends on how much you like heavy (and possibly staining) masonry dust in your carpet. If that is the problem you are trying to solve, it is a very effective technique.

If you have three hands, it will work almost as well. Tape it to the wall and it would be almost as good (except SWMBO may get miffed when you fold up the dustpan and lob it in the bin!) The "envelope" does have the advantage that you can fashion one from any bit of paper to hand in most situations.

Might help if you were a little more specific with the first question then ;-)
> In this thread last Saturday

It needs to be fairly dinky stuff to stay airbourne.

Quite agree, was not suggesting it might.
--
Cheers,

John.

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Well, all I can say is that it works when I do it
Maybe you need a bit of ability along with the technique
--
geoff

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David Peters wrote:

In our house no one would notice - SWIMBO doesn't dust much!
--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
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wrote:

Get an envelope. Ideally DL size, with the flap on the top not the end (typical "A4 folded in 3" commercial envelope - recycle your junkmail for one).
Poke the two bottom corners in, so the the envelope bulges outwards and is an inch or two "thick" at the top edge.
Use a few inches masking tape to tape the envelope flap to the wall, just below the drill hole. Single sided tape, half on the envelope, half on the wall. Don't press the tape down too hard, or it may lift paint from the wall.
Drill. Catch the dust in the open and gaping envelope.
Blow or brush gently to knock the dust off the tape's top edge.
Remove envelope, taking care not to rip the wall off with the tape.
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