HD antenna installation

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I bought a GE Enhanced TV attic mount HD antenna (60 mile range) from Wal-Mart.
http://www.walmart.com/ip/GE-Attic-Mount-Antenna/20976617
I have two TVs in the house, a 42" Sony and a 32" Vizio. My plan is to install the antenna and run a coax cable from it to the junction box where the cable comes into the attic.
1) Can I use one antenna for TVs?
2) Does it matter which side of the attic I install the antenna? I think the stations are closer to the opposite side of my ranch house than the cable junction.
The instructions are mute on these questions.
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On 11/6/2014 9:42 PM, badgolferman wrote:

Start here:
http://www.hdtvprimer.com/ISSUES/erecting_antenna.html
pay attention to the links to other sections about choosing antennas and general installation hints.
Go here to verify whatever you choose in hardware has a chance of picking up a signal
http://www.tvfool.com
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Also antennaweb.org
If your signals are weak and the coax runs are long, you may want an amplifier near the antenna end of the cable. But put it where you can get at it easily in case it needs service. . Mark
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On Thursday, November 6, 2014 10:59:17 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

And since he's already got the antenna, the easiest thing to do would seem to be to just hook it up temporarily with a splitter and see if it works OK or not.
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On 11/06/2014 08:42 PM, badgolferman wrote:

Yes, you will just need a cable splitter

Best to go up there with the antenna and a cell phone and have someone view the reception Vary the location and orientation until you find the area of best reception...could be anywhere.
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Per badgolferman:

I am using one rooftop antenna for effectively four TVs: two actual televisions and two tuners that feed my Tivo-on-steroids PC application.
I find that I need an amplifier. But I also need to split the coax...so I bought a splitter that does double duty as an amplifier.
If the in-attic antenna does not work out, consider a rooftop antenna installed/aimed/tuned by a professional.
--
Pete Cresswell

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On 11/6/2014 6:42 PM, badgolferman wrote:

The environment and direction of the TV stations are important. That antenna is likely to be directional. May be a problem if your stations aren't in the same direction.
Antennaweb.org is a good place to start.
It's likely that you can find an antenna position that works for each TV station. Problem I had was finding a single position that worked for ALL TV stations. I had an outside antenna with a rotor, but that's no help if you time-shift and record several at once.
Reflections are likely to be more of a problem than signal strength. With my early ATSC to NTSC tuner/adapters, I found that attenuating the signal helped. I ended up with several tuners with different attenuation optimized for different channels.
Inside the attic can be a problem depending on the composition of your roof, the metal running around inside the attic, metal gutters, etc.
Trial and error is the best plan.
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badgolferman wrote:

I tried out the attic antenna today. It is supposed to have a range of 60 miles and the broadcast towers are around 25 miles south of me. I pointed it in that direcection and hooked it up to the attic amplifier where the cable comes in. I then auto-scanned for channels on both TVs.
A total of 8 digital channels were detected. Only one of them was HD and that was the ABC affiliate. All the other channels were local useless ones I would never watch. I went back up there and moved the direction of the antenna around a few times and rescanned. Not much changed. According to the antennaweb.org site all the major affiliates should be easily reachable for me.
I am dubious of the attic antenna although my friend who lives 5-10 miles closer to the towers is pleased with his. I may get an outdoor type and try that next.
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On 11/7/14, 4:49 PM, badgolferman wrote:

coax to the antenna, threw a rope over a branch, and hoisted the antenna. I could aim it by a cord tied to one corner. That let me test with a straight connection and nothing to block a signal.
Your problem could be the amplifier. I'd test the antenna with just a coaxial cable.
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On Friday, November 7, 2014 6:21:11 PM UTC-5, J Burns wrote:

I agree he should try it without the amp. That's what I would always do first. I don't have a lot of experience with indoor vs outdoor, but the couple of times I tried it, I did not see much difference in reception. I think if the height is about the same and there is just typical wood construction involved, the reception will probably be similar, meaning if he can't get most channels now, I doubt moving outside is the issue.
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On 11/7/2014 4:49 PM, badgolferman wrote:

stable reception (no audio dropouts or video pixellation) on all major channels. I live within 8 miles of the network stations' broadcast towers, all of which are within a 5 degrees arc. I'm in a major metropolitan suburban area. Even with a professionally installed carefully aimed roof antenna on an extended mast, I didn't have reliable reception on the majority of stations that use the UHF band. Reception was better in the winter (no leaves on the trees to absorb signal?) but still not acceptable regardless of whether I used an amplifier or not. I suspect that even though the antenna was directional, multipath interference from busy fixed wing and helicopter air traffic in nearby airspace was largely to blame. Despite investment in the antenna, I gave up and got FIOS. Only the digital signals that were transmitted on the VHF frequencies were rock stable via over-the-air reception.
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On 11/7/14, 4:49 PM, badgolferman wrote:

http://transition.fcc.gov/mb/engineering/dtvmaps/
If I give them my street address, I get a different list than if I simply give my zip code. I find it much more accurate than antennaweb.
When antennaweb recommends omnidirectional indoor antennas in some cases, I'm very skeptical. When they make recommendations in terms of antenna color coding, I'm very skeptical.
Antennas are often advertized in terms of miles. That's nonsense. The FCC groups stations by the calculated signal strength at the user's site; I can even click a button to get the decibels for a station. That's what the consumer needs to know. It correctly shows that I may do fine with stations 70 miles away but not with one 11 miles away.
The FCC shows the carrier channel for each station. That's likely to be different from the DTV channel number. If I miss a channel when I scan, and the FCC shows I should have a good signal, I can probably get it by pointing my antenna in that direction and punching in the carrier channel.
By showing the calculated strength of signals from various stations at your site, he FCC site can help you figure out if there's something wrong with your setup.
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On Wednesday, November 12, 2014 4:29:07 PM UTC-5, J Burns wrote:

Unfortunatly DTV in the US is very suseptable to multipath. With analog, m ultipath caused ghosting but the picture was for the most part watchable an d ghosting had no impact on the sound. With digital, multipath instead of ghosting, causes blockies and total loss of reception including loss of the sound. But digital can give an excellent picture with a weaker signal as long as there is little multipath. So the best defense against multipath i s a directional antenna amimed correctly. But if the reflection is inline with the desired signal , there is not much you can do except hope the engi neers develop better demodulators.
Mark
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On 11/12/2014 2:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I get my TV signals from repeaters on Grizzly Mountain, directly West. The web site thinks the signal is directly South towards Bend, Oregon.
Pretty useless!!!!
Paul
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On 11/12/14, 10:25 PM, Paul Drahn wrote:

coverage data to the FCC. Did you give them your street address?
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On 11/12/14, 5:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The 4-bay bowtie had a great reputation for UHF analog. IIRC, everybody made it the same: 4 wire "cat whiskers" in front of a mesh screen.
When DTV came in, all the manufacturers seemed to make little modifications to the original design. I wonder if they were refinements to reject secondary paths a little better.
My problems seem to be weather-related, so I suspect that they occur when multipath distortion comes inline, from similarly strong reflections at different atmospheric levels.
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On Friday, November 7, 2014 4:49:17 PM UTC-5, badgolferman wrote:

That 5-10 miles may make a difference, so may the construction of your atti c. If you have a metal roof you will be attenuating the signal to near use lessness.
There is really no difference between an attic antenna and a roof antenna o ther than mounting and location. (likewise, there is no difference between an old school TV antenna and a "HD" antenna whatsoever. Difficulty: since the changeover to digital, channels no longer directly correspond to frequ encies, so e.g. "Channel 2" may actually be a UHF frequency in your area.)
For good reception, very little beats a proper outdoor antenna mounted abov e the roof, although if you go that route make sure that it is properly gro unded.
nate
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There are VHF high band channels being used. I don't know if any use the low VHF low channels using even longer elements. I only have one, channel 13 high band. On my rabbit ears, I pull out 1 1/2 foot or so for 13 . It's also got the UHF loop which is not adjustable except for rotation.
Greg
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you?
Do you have hills or large trees between you and the antenna farm(s)?
What do you mean by "All the other channels were local useless ones" ? You have 7 independent stations not affiliated with any network?
I'm in the Philly area 25 miles from the main antenna farm and get all the main OTA stations with just old fashioned rabbit ears on the first floor..
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A good idea.
Another idea would be to take that long piece of coax and run it up to the attic, and bring up a small TV, so he can look at the picture himself and not go through someone else. (I have a cable jack up there from when I spent a lot of time in the attic, but a temp cable is just as good.)

Definitely. I bought an antenna amp from the sale table at Radio Shack. It was 8 dollars marked down from 30 or so!! Looked new. With my attic antenna and the amp, I could get almost all the DC stations now. (Strangely I don't get channel 20 which iirc is in Baltimore where I live. But I never watched it much anyhow. )
Something went wrong about 2 months later, and I could only get Baltimore again. There was no difference if the amp was in the circuit or if it wasn't. Bought a new amp from Solid Signal. So many choices, I ended up buying the very same amp under a different name. It wasn't very expensive (about $35 or 40) and I knew how well it worked before it broke. I wonder if this one will break too, or if Radio Shack knew something when the cut the price by 75%.
The first time I put both parts of the amp in the attic close to the antenna. The second time I read th e instructions and it said to put the power supply half closer to the TV, or in my case the DVDR. (It runs the power up through the co-ax, at the same time the TV signal is going down it.
BTW, if worst comes to worst it's possible to use two antennas, connected through a splitter (which in this case is a merger or something!) Both can be directional or one can be dir. and the other omnidirectional. The amp should go after where the splitter joins them, unless one antenna has a built in amp.
Are splitters for antenna signals different from other similarly looking splittlers, because frequencies are different? I never paid attention.
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