Has anyone else used PVC sewer pipe for Downspouts

Has anyone else used PVC sewer pipe for rain gutter downspouts? The outlet on the rain gutters on my barn were larger than the average home rain gutters. (I believe 3 inch). The local lumber yard said it would be a special order, and the price was outrageous. So, for about $10 I bought some 4" pvc sewer pipe and a few elbows and 45's and used metal straps to secure it to the barn. It's been on there for 1 1/2 years and has worked well. Never clogged, never any problems, and looks fine too.
The only problem is that I glued it, and now I am adding on to the barn and need to extend and re-fit it. Of course I cant take the glued joints apart. Yeah, I know to cut it and couplers, etc. However, I am just going to save it the way it is (because I can use it on another part of the barn), and make a new one with new materials.
However, I have a question. Rather than glue the new one, I am wondering if it would work to just drill holes in the fittings and install sheet metal screws. (of course all joints "bells" must face upward or be glued if they do face downward). Using screws instead of glue allows me to make changes if I want. Particularly the bottom elbow, since I may want to turn it in the future to change the direction of the ground level extension pipe (also pvc).
Has anyone tried this?
PS I did not screw the top of the downspout to the steel gutter drop, I just pushed it tightly against the gutter and securely strap it to the wall. I never had any problems with this.
Mark
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On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 01:20:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Sounds perfectly OK. If fussy add latex caulking or silicone sealant. That will prevent leaks but won't make a permanent glued bond.
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Nothing at all the matter with it.
Screws would be fine, but as the joints would not have the same strength, you would need to strap the pipe more often.
But as you already are thinking "bell" glue the joint on one side only, and screw the other side
They do make pvc gutters and downspouts too, just more for "residential use" and these just have colors in the plastic.
The only difference in PVC and aluminum is that pvc may break if really hit hard, where aluminum bends.
Don't drive any tractors into it and it will outlast anything else.
BTW if color is an issue, you can buy paint that does hold onto plastics fairly well. (used mostly for lawn furniture)
AMUN
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If you really feel the need to caulk it, consider caulking the bottom half only and a couple of screws at 10 & 2 o'clock. Reasoning: Getting caulked joints apart is a huge pain. That stuff is good and tight and will get into the joint where you will have a hard time separating it with any tool. Also, most of your water run will be in the area between 9 &3 o'clock so you shouldn't need to seal the top part. HTH

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Why not use a No-hub bands. I used 2" pvc for my down spouts on the back of our old house, There were so many leaves I used no bends. I would take them down in the summer.

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I used PVC drain pipe. Thinner and cheaper than sewer pipe. Its lasted 15 years so far. I used screws.
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