Hardwood floor - what direction

It's a little late to ask, since they are here installing the floor now, but there is a question on which way the floor should be laid in relation to the floor joist. The joist run perpendicular on the new addition to those in the old area, and we'd really like to keep the floor running the same direction throughout. the new area is a family room that opens off the new kitchen that is in the old area. There really isn't a good place to 'transition' from one direction to the other.
The installers say it isn't an issue, just run it all the one way (which is perpendicular to the new joist). The general contractor says we should transition. I've opted for the flooring guy's opinion, and the builder has pretty much given in, but says if there are problems it will be the flooring guys responsibility to fix it.
Should I sleep well tonight with the floor looking the way I would like it to look, or should I toss and turn knowing I'll have flooring problems down the road?
Thanks group! You've been a good resource (for useful info and humor!) over the years!
Mark
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mwlogs wrote:

As with most 'finish' flooring, with an adequate subfloor to install over it shouldn't be an issue.
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mwlogs wrote:

It sounds like you're saying the new flooring is perpendicular to the new joists and the old is parallel? I'm surprised the contractor wouldn't be pleased if that is the case as that is the normal. Whether I'd be concerned at all depends on what the underlayment is and what the flooring actually is--I'm assuming you're talking strip wood but don't say whether it's one of the prefinished products or traditional.
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You are not limited to two directions, at right angles to each other. We had an L-shaped room floored in hardwood about four years ago and chose to place the flooring on the diagonal (within a 3-board border along each wall with one contrasting strip, dark instead of light.) This was the right decision in our case. It cost extra (all those 45-degree cuts) but everyone likes it.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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mwlogs wrote:

The advice I was given is to be sure the subfloor is solid, and the boards should point to the source of light... windows, glass doors, etc. Any needed transitions can be done at a doorway. So far they've all come out looking ok.
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If the finished floor is nail to the sub floor, it does not matter. If the subfloor is plywood, it will not matter.
Sleep well.
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If I recall correctly, I have some hardwood flooring in one room that ran on what I'll call slats--maybe 2" wide each, and oh, 1/2 or 3/4" thick that were on top of subfloor. The hardood strip direction was perpendicular to these slats. I saw the slats when I had to replace some rotted oak strips in the middle of the room.
Dunno if that helps the OP any though.
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