Hardwood floor question

My brother and I just restored the hardwood floor in a home I recently bought. Stripped old finish to wood, proper sanding, applied three coats of Minwax Super-Fast Drying Gloss polyurethane. Let each coat sit for 24 hours, lightly sanded using electric hand sander with 220-grit between each coat, vacuumed & tacked floor properly after each light sanding.
Problem: After applying a third and final coat, and letting it sit for 24 hours, we discovered some small, irregularly shaped patches (largest maybe 6-inches x 3-inches) in a few places (maybe 5 or 6 spots) that we apparently missed when putting down the final coat (final coat was applied two days ago, and floors have been left alone since). What is the proper way to deal with these spots? Can they be touched up? Should they be left as-is? Should an additional coat be applied to the entire floor?
Of course, even if we apply another coat (which we *really* don't want to do), we could very well end up with the same problem. If another coat is advisable, any tips on how to best avoid patches like this in the future? We were using 500-watt halogen worklights, and felt that we had adequate lighting for the job, but we didn't notice the missed patches despite the lighting.
A lesser concern: we also have noticed a section of floor where the polyurthane looks especially thick, as though it pooled a bit, and now has a slightly raised, wavy edge on one side (about 12"-18" in length). The area where it is located will likely be covered by an area rug, so I'm not too concerned, but, for posterity's sake, I'd like to know how to deal with it, in case I choose to do so.
Just trying to get some advice on how to proceed.
Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer.
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<< we discovered some small, irregularly shaped patches (largest maybe 6-inches x 3-inches) in a few places (maybe 5 or 6 spots) that we apparently missed when putting down the final coat >> << any tips on how to best avoid patches like this in the future? >>
Your problems IMO could be lighting the work area. For work like this you need low level lighting that will reflect or show in relief any imperfections. This is similar to the way drywall pros and painters work. Having the work light behind you and illuminationg the suface head on washes out the imperfections. Any portrait photographer can relate to this. So you need to light the floor at floor level with the light ahead of you (or maybe at the side for some areas) to bring out all the imperfections. Consider this technique for cleaning up the problem areas before you put on that final (and near perfect) coat. Good luck.
Joe
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Floor mans best friend is a sharp scraper. You can scrape the area carefully and recoatfor sheen(or polish but that requires more advice)
Maybe better is to use a safety razor blade and pull it towards you in a scraping motion. It will peel finish. The finish should be cured for this technique though.
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