Hardi Siding

I've wanted to re-side with this product for years, but only recently got an estimate. I'm 'wondering' about the procedure the contractor uses, so I'm looking for some knowledgable advice.
House is sided with Masonite fibreboard, 21yrs and has been painted twice. The contractor will replace any water damaged board (mostly the bottom 12" on the North side) with OSB and wrap the siding with Tyvek. I don't know that I like that approach. Contractor claims the siding will act as a good insulator. The Hardi planks will cover the Tyvek'd fibreboard siding. I don't know what the lifespan of the fibreboard is but the Hardi siding is good for 50+ years.
I was surprised to hear of this procedure since I was thinking the old board would be removed then poly board installed and that then Tyvek'd.
Is the contractors plan sound? Thanks!
Dave S(Texas)
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On Mar 2, 9:01 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

there is no reason to add more. Adding even an inch of insulation creates a lot of problem with the install since the wall surface will no longer match up with doors, windows, and other fixtures.
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Pardon? No insulation is being added. He is proposing to add/install the Hardi siding over the exisisting masonite siding. That is what I'm asking: if that is an accepted installation method?
Dave S(Texas)
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On Mar 3, 8:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

It is acceptable so long as the new material will reasonably match up with doors, windows, and other fixtures. The existing siding has a certain thickness and matches up with the fixtures at a certain point. What is the thickness of the siding you have chosen? Take your ruler and go out and see where it will meet the existing fixtures.
You would not want to install siding which increases the thickness of your wall so much that it would extent past the window and doors frames. Porch lights and other electrical may have to be re-wired with extended boxes if the width of the wall is increased significantly. Other things may also be attached to your wall as well further complicating things.
Installing over existing siding has very few advantages. The main advantage is that it will be less work and more profit for the contractor. In the contractors mind: out of site, out of mind. Tearing of the old stuff may require a crew and a dumpster. Covering it over could be done by one or two guys on short notice.
It would ALWAYS be better to remove the old siding. Of course it will cost more and be inconvenient for the contractor and for you. When the old siding is removed problems often come up with the sheathing and some may have to be replaced if water damaged. It is not unusual for there to be water damage underneath old siding or roofing. Would you want the old stuff covered with new if you knew there might be water damage and mold underneath?
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On Mar 3, 8:53 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

I've used hardie on 2 houses...and if I ever build another it too will have it. I wouldn't count on any insulation from the hardi...it isn't an insulator. As mentioned already, the replacement process is sound, and the Tyvek is ONLY a air and moisture barrier. Google each product and research the installation of each. The more knowledge you have the better prepared you'll be when the install happens.
Good luck,
DAC
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Knowledge is probably where my hesitation comes from...lol I retired from residential/commercial/industrial construction(45yrs/electrician), due to health reason, two years ago. Like I mentioned before, I intended to do this job myself, and all the time what held me back was having to remove all that old siding. Having this contractor installing over the old siding 'threw me'. This is a small house and only 3 sides to do...no soffit replacement. I really should replace the existing 1-pane cheap-ass builders-grade widows first(8). Years ago I cut/installed plexiglass on the exterior of those windows, so they are 'kinda' double-pane, but the newer widows are much superior nowadays. 5 of the 8 are directly North facing and the other 3 are directly West facing, so it's a good idea. Darn shame I'm poor now....lol
I'll get estimates from some other contractors......
Thanks for the advice. I appreciate it!
Dave S(Texas)
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Darn shame I'm poor

but the budget, lol. You will save plenty by covering over the old siding and no one will know but you, lol. An increase in the budget would be required for a tear-off. You can find some really ugly shit that will cost plenty when you do tear-offs.
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On Sun, 4 Mar 2007 09:46:10 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Here in hot humid Houston, there is a serious concern about the external siding trapping and holding moisture. Many of the wiser home builders take this into account when they finish out the rear siding on the brick and rock homes.
I've seen enough vinyl and aluminum siding removed from wood exteriors where there was extensive wood rot to know it can be a problem. Where it is difficult to remove the siding, I've seen furring strips used to let the wood breathe.
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It's humid in Houston?....hmm I'm up near Austin so humid isn't in our vocabulary too often, except when ya'll blow it up our way.
There is a concern with this masonite in that regard though. It wicks any moisture available, at the bottom of the sheet, especially around a concrete patio. I've had to 'hide' damage at the bottom edges with a cedar trim board rim.
There was a class-action suit brought against the manufacturer. I participated and ended up receiving a $280 check. The inspector didn't see as much damage as I did, apparently. He inspected when I was, hospital/chemo/radiation/someplace. I wasn't able to give him/her 'my' input...as if that would have helped lol.
Dave S(Texas)
bringbacktheOilers/banishtheTexanstoTen
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On Mar 4, 9:46 am, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

Hi Dave,
You know if you decide how you want to trim your corners, there wouldn't be any reason functionally that you would only replace one side per year..that would certianly put less strain on the budget, and let you do the whole thing right...it doesn't sound like you're in a speed race, and you know some exercise would be a good thing.
If you do choose do this on you're own, I would really recommend these: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)- Gauging/dp/B000HVEVX4/ref=cm_cr-mr-title/102-6881849-1580104> Theybasically allow you to work at your pace and provide you with an extra pair of hands.
Good luck...wish you the best...
DAC
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I've got a son-in-law! Keep forgetting about him, for some reason...oh yeah, he installs carpet..... Anyway he does have some skills.
Dave S(Texas)
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