Grounding wire for house. Is this right?

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You can have all the electrodes you want
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

I need about 8 on my head and one on my willy. Would that suffice?
--
Tekkie

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On Thursday, December 10, 2015 at 11:05:57 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The #2 or better for the ground ring, while everything else is #4? Other than that, I give up.
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2015 12:54:03 -0800 (PST), trader_4

We have a winner. (email me an address for your prize)
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My 1950s era house had a 100amp panel, with a grounding wire that ran to my well and was clamped to the well casing. I hired a licensed electrician to upgrade to 200amp panel. He also installed 2-3 ground rods outside the house and connected from the new panel to them, AS WELL AS running from the panel via a heavy wire (looks like #6 aluminum strand) clamped to the copper water pipe downstream of my pressure tank. Notice... he didn't connect to the well casing, but to the piping on the "house" side of the pressure tank, and the pressure tank is separated from the well casing by my pump and black rubber hose (i.e. no electrical continuity). And he left the original ground wire as-is on the well casing.
Never noticed all this until recently. Is this correct? Shouldn't there be a jumper cable to connect across the black rubber hose (from the copper pipes to the well casing?)
Just curious Experienced advice appreciated. Thanks Theodore.
I would not ground to the well casing to avoid possible electrolysis damage.
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On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 21:34:32 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The well casing is an available electrode and it most be used. The Grounding Electrode Conductor to water pipes is sized by 250.66 and should be #4 for your typical 200a service. Since made electrodes like ground rods are not really that effective, you only need #6, no matter what the service is. The wire to the isolated interior water pipe is only bonding the pipe, you should be bonding to the house side of the plastic so jumper around the water softener.
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Thought so. Will do. Thanks!
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2015 00:21:14 -0800 (PST), Uncle Monster

like #6 aluminum strand) clamped to the copper water pipe downstream of my pressure tank. Notice... he didn't connect to the well casing, but to the piping on the "house" side of the pressure tank, and the pressure tank is separated from the well casing by my pump and black rubber hose (i.e. no electrical continuity). And he left the original ground wire as-is on the well casing.

engineering department often requires things that are stricter or over and above that which is in the NEC. I have installed dielectric unions when joining galvanized to copper water pipe then ground clamps on the pipes with a #4 jumper around the dielectric union. The electrical inspection department here is fond of #4 grounding conductors on everything related to power for residential and light commercial. For telecom and cable systems #14 to #10 in homes but usually #6 to the telecom system backboard ground bars in business and industrial locations. From what I remember for backboard ground bars a #6 grounding conductor to the nearest power system ground

changes the city electrical inspectors want to see but I always had to satisfy them since they had the final say.¯\_(?)_/¯

You size Grounding Electrode Conductors with 250.66 based on the service conductor size but for the typical 200a service (2/0 copper or 4/0 aluminum conductors) the GEC is #4. examples with copper #2 (100a) = #8 #1 or 1/0 (150a) = #6 2/0-3/0 (200a) = #4 Up to 350 kcmil (400a) = #2 etc Later they refine that by electrode size and when it is a made electrode you get here ************** 250,66(A) Connections to Rod, Pipe, or Plate Electrodes. Where the grounding electrode conductor is connected to rod, pipe, or plate electrodes as permitted in 250.52(A)(5) or (A)(7), that portion of the conductor that is the sole connection to the grounding electrode shall not be required to be larger than 6 AWG copper wire or 4 AWG aluminum wire **************.
note that you can't use aluminum wire within 18" of the dirt so this really means #6 copper
************** 250.64 (A) Aluminum or Copper-Clad Aluminum Conductors. Bare aluminum or copper-clad aluminum grounding conductors shall not be used where in direct contact with masonry or the earth or where subject to corrosive conditions. Where used outside, aluminum or copper-clad aluminum grounding conductors shall not be terminated within 450 mm (18 in.) of the earth. **************
The largest size required for a Ufer is #4 per 250.66(B) and 250(C) says a conductor to a ground ring need not be larger than the conductor in the ring but that is a minimum #2.
It gets even more confusing when you are connecting to interior piping. If you are talking about water pipe being used as an electrode you size by 250.66 but if you are just bonding the pipe you use 250.104 that says you size the wire based on the circuit likely to energize the wire based on 250.122 (the same size as you would use for the equipment grounding conductor) That could be as small as #14 cu if the only circuit that gets near it is 15a
Some still read it to say all water pipe bonding shall be sized to 250.66 but if this is not part of the GES, I am not sure how you can justify that. As usual the AHJ generally has the last word so you need to ask your local guy. Fighting city shall is seldom worth the hassle.
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