Ground Or Neutral Wire Question

Page 2 of 2  
Black wire Neutral, Negative, -, Ground (This is the basically the negative end of the circuit)
White wire Positive, Hot, + (This is basically the Positive end of the circuit, and is the one that comes from the breakers)
No insulation or green insulation Ground, Case Ground (This is there to give the hot wire something easy to touch so that it will blow a breaker instead of laying there like a trap waiting for you to touch it, and is electrically the same as the Black Wire when you test it with your meter.)
Be sure that all your plugs are wired the same or you can get shocked by touching two cases at the same time that are plugged into two different plugs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


You have your colour codes precisely backwards. Black is hot. White is neutral.
In AC housewiring, "negative", "-", "positive" and "+" are simply wrong. It's AC, remember?
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Lewis wrote:

Figures. Looks like I have them backwards.
Anyone have a web cite that would show the correct wiring? I got my information form a web cite that had a picture of a plug. I still have the pic as a file to refer back to.
No matter how you wire it, it has to be the same as what is already there. If they have it backward, then you better stick with there wiring code or you will get shocked.
And as to + & - in AC, it is simply a better way to keep track of what is going on.
You have to have a completed circuit to do anything (a + & -) and thinking of it this way helps keep things simple.
Much to hard for most people to grasp that that one wire is a + 30 times a second, and a - 30 times a second.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually it is + 60 times a second and - 60 times a second. Sixty hertz is "60 cycles per second" and each cycle has both + and - alternations. Reversed power wiring often is caused by people who are more familiar with automotive or electronic wiring than with AC power conventions. It obviously works but creates totally unnecessary and possibly severe hazards.
Don Young
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

probably negative-ground DC. where the - (ground) wire is often black.

If you're using that 60Hz AC to power an incandescent light, the light output is 120Hz (since either polarity lights it). It wouldn't be easy to get 30Hz from it.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Young wrote:

You may be right. I would have to get access to an oscilloscope to be sure.
Either way, it switched way to often and fast for me to try to keep track of it so I just try to make sure that all my plugs are the same.
The thing that amazes me is how few people actually know or understand this fact (AC switches + & - on the same wire).
I have even had people that worked with the electric company who's profession was to work on the high lines that constantly clamed that I was wrong.
He kept saying that an AC current was traveling down the line, but could not comprehend what that actually meant.
Swore that the + wire was always +, but with an AC signal going down it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Believe that at your own risk. Black is hot. Maybe you're getting it confused with DC (as in a car).

That is, black wire (hot) to the shorter slot and white wire (neutral) to the longer slot.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bzzzt! Sorry, but thanks for playing. That's exactly backwards. Hope you don't try to do your own AC wiring...
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

IMHO, it is a grounded [service] conductor. Notice the -ed suffix; it is important. I put service in brackets because you can usually leave that word out.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

It's confusing because a neutral wire is not required to be insulated when ran overhead. A true neutral carries the difference in current between TWO out of phase hot legs of a single phase system or TWO or more phases of a 3 phase system. The neutral also maintains a balanced voltage. That's why when there is a bad neutral connection in a house that some lights will be dim and others will be bright.
In a house in a circuit that has a black, white, and bare wire in a romex cable, the white wire is technically _not_ a neutral wire since it does not carry the difference in current between two circuits. HOWEVER in the trade, to avoid confusion, any white or gray wire is called a "neutral", and any bare or green wire is called a "ground".
The "ground", as electrician's would say, is technically the grounding conductor; more specifically, the equipment grounding conductor.
If that isn't confusing enough we can throw in the term "bonding" :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

There are hundreds of web sites that discuss this subject. For example:
http://www.electrical-online.com/howtoarticles/Grounding.htm
http://www.hammerzone.com/archives/elect/panel/breaker/install.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

confusing you further is possible. The bare wire from the utility is a grounded conductor, not necessarily a neutral and has nothing to do with your house wiring terminology. The utility works on a different set of rules and regs.
Where I live the bare conductor in the service drop is called the "messenger wire" or sometimes the 'static' wire. It is usually steel or steel core surrounded by AL. Much stronger than the "conductors" that are insulated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SQLit wrote:

Even though the neutral conductor on the entrance cable is grounded, that means is at ground potential but will carry current difference between the two hot legs. When suspended can be bare, others are insulated as so can be twisted together and not short. Buried lines have all conductors insulated.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.