Good for firewood?

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The tree I cut uip today had leaves all over it, and "fruit" too.
I've never cut up a live tree before, only dead stuff that fell over because it was dead.
But the little chain saw went through this wood very quickly. IMO.
Before Ihrow the wood in the stream bed, does that mean it might be good as firewood, or would it have to sit for a year or two.
If I shouldn't throw it in a stream bed, dry most of the year, what should I do with it. I have enough firewood already and I can't babysit it for a year.
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You can never have too much firewood. Keep it.
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firewood?:

Yes, "green" wood generally cuts easier than seasoned (dry) wood.

Let it dry out for a year, preferably someplace protected from rain, but that isn't absolutely necessary.

Don't stack it in a stream bed. Stack it someplace with good drainage and the least exposure to wetness. The dryer the better, but just stacked out in the open where it can dry out after getting rained on will work. If you can cover it with a tarp after it's stacked it will dry better.
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wrote:

I had no idea! It was worth asking for this fact alone.

I'm sorry. I should have said, "If I don't want it, before I throw it in the stream bed to get rid of it...." It was clear to me, but I see that it's totally unclear to a reader.

This didn't help. I meant if there is some environmental reason I shouldn't throw it in the stream bed.

I would but I have a 6' x 4' stack already and I'm not using much of it.
Thanks.
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Just a comment on "throw it in the stream" Don't do it. It will only stay there and not rot as long as it remains covered with water.
Harry K
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wrote:

That's what I meant by stream *bed*. It only floods for about 10 or 20 hours a year, spread out over about 4 incidents a year. The rest of the time it's the ground may be damp but there's no standing water in that part of the bed. The normal stream has running water all the time, but this is the flood stage bed.
The property management woman was going to call the company that mows the lawn. I guess they would take the wood away, but would they find a better use for it?
Maybe the pieces of the trunk but what about the limbs that are 4 inches thick or less?
It seems like a lot of work for them for very little benefit to society. Plus they bill the HOA.

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I'm curious. Just what do you think you would accomplish by tossing it in the stream bed?
Harry K
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wrote:

I get rid of it.

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On Wednesday, June 12, 2013 1:38:48 AM UTC-4, micky wrote:

What kind of fruit is it? Fruitwood is good for barbeque; I've been cooking over wood from an apple tree I cut down a couple years ago.
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wrote:

It turns out it is a cottonwood. I put "fruit" in quotes because it is not edible. I don't know if that makes a difference.
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wrote:

basswood. Might be good for a woodcarver. Not terrific firewood - burns easiy but not a lot of heat - more smoke than, say, maple or oak.
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micky,
Fruit trees are hardwoods and make good firewood after drying. Takes about a 9 mon. where I live. Green fruitwood is great for smoking on the BBQ.
Dave M.
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On Wed, 12 Jun 2013 08:36:56 -0400, "David L. Martel"

wouldn't smoke food with it - but it WILL smoke when burned.
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On 6/12/2013 12:38 AM, micky wrote:

If, indeed, it was a cottonwood (see other note on identifying it for certain), the wood itself is virtually worthless for anything, including firewood.
If you're lucky somebody will be willing to haul it off...
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Worthless for anything? There are a lot of people living out in the middle and west side of the country that will disagree. Value of any wood depends on where it it is. Were I in the Eastern US I wouildn't touch cottonwood as far better wood is available. May come as news to you but world in the Northern Hemisphere there is far more softwood than hardwood burned as hardwoods are not available.
FWIW that you apparently don't know. ALL wood contains approximately the same BTU per pound. Thus a pound of balsa will put out just as much heat as a pound of oak.
Harry K
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On 6/12/2013 9:52 AM, Harry K wrote: ...

I know quite a lot about cottonwood and wood scarcity, actually, living on the High Plains where the cottonwood is about the only thing there was (and precious few of them before turn of 20th century).
They were used some, yes, and there were even attempts early on to actually turn them into commercial lumber but all were _very_ shortlived.
That it does have a similar Btu content doesn't mean that it burns at all well and is much suited for firewood, either. It is similar to some of the other common trees in the area such as Siberian elm in that it produces a very high quantity of ash when burned.
From US Forest Products Laboratory...

I'll concede it is used some in small items such as containers and such where the white color lets it be stenciled easily and it does make a good pulp wood for paper for much the same reasons. How much is actually commercially consumed viz a viz other species I didn't look up but I suspect it's a pretty small fraction.
The tree itself (other than the nuisance cotton-shedding) is quite a nice shade tree and being akin to the aspens, the leaf rustling sounds are very pleasant in moderate to low breezes. Unfortunately, here in SW KS the days of only "moderate" wind aren't necessarily all that common altho today is pretty good, last to have been steady 30-40 mph gusting to 45+. Tomorrow is projected another at 30 or so ahead of the next front.
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Your original comment was that it was worthless for _firewood_. The only thing you medntioned about that was it produces a lot of ash.
There is a lot of cottonwood used for firewood where other species aren't available.
Comes down to a cord of cottonwood in the stacks is way more valuable than a cord of oak you don't have.
Harry K
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On 6/12/2013 10:58 PM, Harry K wrote:

It's still pretty much worthless; only that if there's nothing else then one may have to make do...
And I also mentioned it doesn't burn worth a crap for fire, too...too fast if dry and not easy to keep going if wet.
All in all, as a wood except for pulpwood and some other very limited uses it's just not much of anything to brag about.
It's much better as a tree.
--


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Maybe I can put it back together again.
All my muscles are sore and I was too tired to do any work on Wednesday, but my back has not hurt since Tuesday, the day I cut it up. . It's been hurting for 3 months if I walk more than 10 minutes.
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wrote:

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