Glue for wooden garden/deck chair?

Fixing up an 'Adirondack' adjustable/folding outdoor chair. And have it substantially apart at moment prior to reassembling. Seems to be 100% clear cedar.
Wooden pieces are all there and in pretty good condx. but some improper fasteners (which look like modified plaster-board screws have rusted away). Am wondering if it would be good idea to also use glue where wood meets wood?
And if so what type of glue would be best for outdoor use on cedar?
For example there are 7 slats to the seat back which are each fastened with two screws at each of three levels to the curved pieces that support it.
Also two arm rests that were each held on by three screws, now rusted, into end grain of vertical support pieces. Not good design! And may modify them.
Also; as either part of the original manufacture or maybe added later are two pieces of what at first sight looked like that perforated pipe support/hanging strapping, used hidden, where the chair back slats meet their supports! Maybe it wasn't pipe support metal but it has also rusted (It's an outside chair after all!) and some rust has stained some areas, fortunately sort of out of sight on the back and some of the black can be sanded out.
Any other advice welcome; been thinking of building such a chair from plans, when this one was presented with its few problems, as mentioned, during community clean up week!
Thanks for any help. It's another of those 'too good to throw away' projects! BTW I'm going to downgrade one of the two wooden picnic tables on our large deck to the role of only cutting up wood on.
They both came free for the effort of being collected with our pickup as owners upgraded to fancier 'store bought' (That means imported from China!) tables and chair sets! (You can even buy them at the s.market with your groceries now!).
A third one was also free and a few years ago I donated it to a divorced mother with several children. Now remarried her husband has put a new top on that one, doing a nicer job that I would. Anyway reuse and recycling are alive and well. And boy does it help the bank account!
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Yes orprergnadsaderbkineuhgbleakudefoodhundesshniosessiaCheck the adhesive shelves at your box store, Titebond III is good got outdoors, and likely several others.
Joe
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You wouldnt believe the things I find on the curb just before trash day. Most recently I picked up a tent that had some damaged supports. I did a little googling and found the value of the tent was about $500 USD. A call to the manufacturer got me replacement parts for shipping cost. I have several computers that needed very minor repairs, microwave ovens, toys, trampolines, lots of exercise equipment including a Bally life cycle that only needed a new battery. My daughters GS troop has a yard sale a couple of times a year with the girls getting to keep a portion of the sales and the rest going to the troup. My daughter did very well this past year.
As far as glueing up furniture I like Titebond but have recently tried Gorrila glue and I think I like it a little more for doing repairs where the pieces may not fit so well.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote: ...

...
Resorcinol glues (Gorilla is just one brand) don't fill voids any better or even as well as they foam rather than expand in a solid glue line. Testing shows the bonds are mechanically weaker than either white or yellow glues. They are fully waterproof but for anything not exposed continuously the Type III PVA glues are adequate water resistance.
Whatever glue try to use, will have to clean the edges well and fit them for it to have any lasting benefit.
However, probably just as well to forget the glue and use good outdoor-rated fasteners; the cross joints and the end grain mentioned specifically won't hold long anyway...
FWW (www.taunton.com/finewoodworking iirc) published winners of a competition for Adirondack design (I think from the North Boston School) a while back and there was a cover article on building a specific design even more recently...
--
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Thank you indeed for all the suggestions re Adirondack style chair reassembly. Dropping by shortly to view how a similar chair belonging to an acquaintance is fastened and held together. Cheers
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dpb wrote:

Been a while since you saw or used resorcinol ?
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote: ...

Sorry, brain cramp...can't believe I didn't catch that faux pas, sorry.... :(
Gorilla and the ilk are polyurethane glues...
--
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I use Titebond III exterior (Green label) and screws for outdoor woodwork http://www.titebond.com/WNTitebondIIITB.asp
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I've had good results with Titebond III but I've also used epoxy if there are voids that need filling. Use stainless steel screws, of course.
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re: ... improper fasteners - which look like modified plaster-board screws have rusted away.
Just curious: Modified in what way?
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Hi DD. Several screws seemed to have tips cut or broken off! Suspect several original screws rusted away and someone used whatever they had on hand to try and refasten some of the back of seat slats at the bottom (where snow and water would collect, ref metal strips, if chair left out during the winter?) Not sure about that but seems a reasonable assumption! The chair as mentioned is complete but had started to fall apart when I got it, mainly due the rusting of those screws and also due the rusting of two strange strips of metal mounted, almost hidden behind the middle and bottom seat back slat supports which are curved and made of wood. Got chance to look at a similar chair yesterday and it also has the metal strips! Now think that the metal might be there for ease of production; bur it led to the idea of screwing 'and gluing' the seat back slats to their curved supports as an alternative to metal strips that rust! Although suppose could fabricate some strips out of stainless steel. It would involve cutting and then drilling 28 holes. Another idea may be to drill and bolt the bottom row of seat back slat fasteners, right through the supports, using ss bolts with the nuts washers and countersunk. maybe the most force is exerted, due to the design at that bottom mounting? The chair carries a small tacked on tin sign that says "WOOD", whether that's the manufacturer or the material not sure. As also mentioned this all started after had downloaded a plan for a type of 'Adirondack' or similar named Outdoor Chair; intending to draw it out on one inch squared paper and make one from available pine and/ or some old redwood. Then this 'slightly broken' but ostensibly complete one showed up during a community clean up week ................ and not wishing to waste anything!!!!!! And like anything else it's been a learning process. So thanks folks for the ideas and the questions.
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On Mon, 13 Jul 2009 06:50:17 -0700 (PDT), terry

Yes, use a water resistant wood glue such as Titebond or Elmer's. The bottle should say for exterior use. Best to clamp the joint overnight.
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Yup. Thanks; joint glued and then screwed!
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