glazing bow windows on 80 year old house... question about inside window

hi, I have recently relgazed a large bow window on my house. my house is appox 80 years old. my question is regarding the inside of the window. I am going to paint the inside of the window . Side note- since the windows had very poor glazing- lots of moisture seeped into the inside section of the window and has caused the paint in the house to peel. I am in the process of scrapping the paint from the inside section of the bow windows- this is- inside the hosue.. Is it necessary to put any glaze compound on the inside of the window? or should I just put paint there... Again, the outside have been reglazed- my question is about the inside.. Thanks
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What's there now? Normally with a window that uses glazing, it only goes on the outside of the window around the perimeter of each pane of glass after the glass is put in against the wood. The other side of the glass just rests against the wood frame of the window.
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wrote:

thanks yes I realize glaze is on the outside.. on the inside- which is my living room I have scraped paint but was wondering if i should put something around glass edges on the inside to stop moisture? or just paint it thanks!!
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The "correct" (or infinitely nit picked) procedure for glazing or re- glazing a wooden window is:
1) apply some thinned orange shellac to the window sash material where the glass will seat and allow it to dry 2) apply a very small amount of glazing compound to the same surface to act as a bedding compound 3) seat the glass and glaze as usual 4) on the inside I typically prep with a bit latex caulk and paint as usual
If the sashes have been neglected or moisture damaged, I suggest applying a couple treatments of lineseed oil thinned with turpentine prior to the shellac.
I use an organic linseed oil glazing compound. http://www.solventfreepaint.com/window_glazing.htm
cheers Bob
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wrote:

Not good nitpicking when you never mentioned points, or putty bevel angle. But lets not go there.
--Vic
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On 2/12/2012 4:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The proper way to reglaze is to place glazing compound before the glass so that there is g.c. on inside and outside. Inside, of course, would be a very thin layer. If the interior wood is "weathered", it should be sanded prior to priming and painting. Painting will leave a fine line of paint on the glass, which aids in keeping moisture from reaching the wood.
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wrote:

Yes, I always used a thin ribbon of putty to bed the new glass. Not for water resistance, but to prevent rattles. If the outside was glazed right, the inside will only get moisture from inside condensation. Filling those small gaps with paint keeps moisture out. Glass is an easy place to use masking tape, but a razor cleans it up so easy I never bothered with tape. I always used boiled linseed oil on badly weathered wood windows before painting Seemed to work well.
--Vic
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On 2/12/2012 2:46 PM, KOS wrote:

Well, the time to have done any needed repair (other than cosmetic) was while you had the glass out.
I like a thin primer or at a minimum soak w/ linseed oil the frame under the glass for some moisture protection but it's too late after having glazed unless you did.
The inside is not glazed; just do as any repaint--scrape, rough prep and needed repair then sanding and if weathered an oxalic acid wash to remove oxidized layer that will prevent long-term adherence if present and then normal prep and paint.
--
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Your best bet would be to seal the inside glass/wood interface with a curing type oil. Linseed oil (boiled) is good, tung oil is better. Read the directions on the tung oil container for diluents like turpentine, or whatever, and thin as need to allow maximum penetration. Wipe off the excess as directed, and recoat as reccommended. The cure will take several weeks, after which the wood can be painted.
Joe
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On 2/13/2012 8:03 PM, Joe wrote:

That is a good plan, but doesn't work with all glazing compounds. This would be for oily g.c., I believe. Gotta follow label directions/ Here is a link to one of DAP's glazing compound tech. data sheets: http://www.dap.com/docs/tech/00010401.pdf
It recommends using an oil-based primer on wood prior to glazing.
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The window has already been glazed.
I agree with dpb....just paint the damn thing.
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