GFCI wall outlet in unfinished basement

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I want to add a surface-mounted GFCI outlet on the wall in an unfinished basement (for a washing machine). The wiring going to the outlet will be 12/2 NM.
I think I can figure out how to do it if I just use a metal box and metal conduit. But, I am wondering if there is a way that I can do it using plastic/PVC instead of metal. I am thinking of using this type of PVC box:
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/4FYW1 ,
and then running the 12/2 NM wire down along the wall through 1/2-inch PVC conduit to get to the box.
If I do that, my question is, "Is there some type of fitting or adapter that goes on the top end of the PVC conduit where the 12/2 NM enters the PVC conduit?"
If so, is that type of fitting shown anywhere in this product brochure?:
http://www.kraloyfittings.com/download/Cat%20kraloy%20ftgs.pdf
Thanks.
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The pvc and pvc box is fine. If you can't run the conduit continuous into the breaker box, terminate it in a 4" square metal box adjacent to the panel, then from that box into the panel. The fittings you would use are called male adaptors
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Thanks.
I think I may have mistakenly described this as having the 12/2 NM feed to the outlet running horizontally along the wall from the breaker box to the outlet. That is not the case. The 12/2 NM feed from the breaker box will be up in between the ceiling joists and then will run "down" (meaning vertically down) along the wall to the outlet. Where it runs down along the wall it will be enclosed in the PVC conduit.
So, I am assuming that I can just have the 12/2 NM feed enter the vertical PVC conduit above the outlet in between the ceiling joists. And, I am trying to figure out if I need to put some type of fitting there where the NM enters the conduit. I know that if it were metal conduit I could put a fitting there that would clamp onto the NM and clamp onto the metal conduit. But do I need something like that when using PVC conduit? I don't see any similar fittings in PVC like the ones I see for metal conduit.
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You're really supposed to use individual conductors inside a conduit, pvc or metal. That requires an accessible box above to transition to. I think you are overengineering this. You said unfinished so I'm assuming the wall studs are accessible. If you are able to staple the 12/2 along the side of a wall stud I believe that is all that is required for protection in an unfinished space. You can also mount a normal box against the same wall stud.
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OK, I got it now. Yes, you can sleeve the nm in pvc for protection, vertically from the box to the ceiling. PVC is more bulky and ugly than steel tubing , but it's perfectly acceptable. You need to put a male adapter with a plastic threaded bushing on the end of the pvc where the nm enters it, and the cable must be stapled to the joists withing 12" of that point. as per NEC334.15C

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RBM wrote:

A minor quibble - the requirement is "insulated bushing or adapter" - I think just a PVC male adapter or coupling is required at the top. The Romex jacket has to extend at least 1/4" into the box.
If you use a metal box and EMT, the plastic bushing is required. That is a change in the 2008 NEC - not obvious to me what a plastic bushing adds to just a connector.
334.15C is specifically "unfinished basements", but you should be able to use a running board as John said. I like a metal box and EMT. If there are studs, you could run down the side of the stud.
In addition to GFCI protection in unfinished basements you need GFCI protection where the receptacle is within 6 ft of the edge of "laundry, utility and wet bar sinks". Modern GFCIs should not nuisance trip.
--
bud--

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I agree, and typically use emt. It's just a cleaner looking job. In the past, when I have used pvc as a sleeve, I would round off the edge with a rat tail, so as not to cut the Romex, but I have had occasions where inspectors wanted male adaptors with plastic bushings.
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*I always thought a clamp was required at the end of the conduit. Maybe I just do it out of habit.
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It's probably because years ago when you did what the OP is doing, except with BX and EMT, you had to choke it to keep the ground continuous. Since there's no external ground involved with NM, you're just concerned with it getting ripped out, so you have the staple requirement. In any event it appears that clamping the cable is always acceptable, and stapling is sometimes acceptable.
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">>>>>>>> I want to add a surface-mounted GFCI outlet on the wall in an

*Roy I looked it up. Article 334.15(C). A bushing and staple is permitted for NM sleeved in conduit. Thanks for setting me straight. I think I am ready to get a job as an electrician now :-)
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If you're just ready now, that means a bunch of us still have a ways to go!!!

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I dont think you can run 12/2 NM and still comply with The NEC. How far is the distance? If the distance is very short I dont think it matters.
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wrote:

I dont think you can run 12/2 NM and still comply with The NEC. How far is the distance? If the distance is very short I dont think it matters.
Why not?
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As long as the 12/2 has a ground wire electrically you are ok. but your local zoning may require conduit or BX, depending on how the unions have twisted the local building folks around to their more expensive way of thinking.
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*I do not know of a fitting or combination of fittings that will be in compliance for sleeving Romex through PVC. You need to have a connector on the end of the PVC and the only way that I can think to accomplish this is using a PVC female adaptor and a two screw metal squeeze connector. However by code the metal connector must be grounded. If you want conduit, use 1/2" EMT with a changeover connector on the end. A four inch metal square box for the outlet will be cheaper than that plastic one at Grainger. Home Depot sells EMT offset connectors for going into the box.
I'm not sure why you need to sleeve the wire down the wall. You could just mount a 1"x4" piece of wood down the wall and staple the wire to it as well as screw the box to it.
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Thanks. I think the code now says that the wire running down the wall needs to be protected and that the old way of stapling the NM to a 1x4 on the wall is no longer considered acceptable. But I don't know that for sure -- it's just something I think I picked up somewhere along the way.
I do know that I could do the whole thing using metal as you suggested, and I may end up doing that. But I would like to be able to use PVC if I can do it that way. I have a hunch that the PVC conduit and fittings are not made to do what I want to do and instead are made for continuous end-to-end waterproof conduit etc.
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*The conduit sleeve is not required unless you anticipate possible physical damage to the wire if it is not protected. You can use the PVC and a metal box together. You just ground the box. If you have a code book read article 334.15.
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John Grabowski wrote:

Thanks. I did just read 334.15 online at http://nfpaweb3.gvpi.net/rrserver/browser?title=/NFPASTD/7008SB .
There seems to be a gray area in there somewhere in terms of the "protection from physical damage" issue. It doesn't seem to be clear. Apparently, it is specifically okay to staple NM cable along running boards that go across the ceiling joists in an unfinished basement.
But, there is nothing specific about the stapling of NM cable to a running board that goes vertically down the wall to an outlet or switch. I guess that means it is allowed unless there is some reason to believe that the NM cable there needs to be protected from physical damage.
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Jay-T wrote:

Oops, just to clarify "Jay-T" and "Beta-42" are both me, just different identities set up on two different Usenet newsservers.
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JayTKR wrote:

Oops, sorry again. I seem to be suffering from multiple computer multiple personality disorder. It started when the news.eternal-september.org new server was down for a while and I was using my backup news servers are set up with different identities.
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