getting rid of rats

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On Fri, 22 Jul 2016 16:44:01 +0000, Don wrote:

Half the dogs in the country have died since Terry made his post *ten* years ago.
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They may be stiff, but they're not frozen.
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I found this interesting: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/ipm/msg0118535629276.html

The Continuing Saga of Mice: I saw this method somewhere on this site or a different link.........it costs nothing, is humane and it works.
Last night before going to bed I took an empty toilet paper roll and flattened the bottom so it made a tunnel and could set flat on the kitchen counter. I put a little dab of peanut butter on one end and hung the baited end out over the counter with the kitchen trash can directly below the counter. The trashcan is about 2 feet tall and smooth walled. This is important because mice can jump up about 12" and can climb rough vertical surfaces.
I stuck the toilet paper roll tunnel next to the backsplash and woke up to the paper roll and mouse in the trashcan.........I didn't even spend a lot of time flattening the T.P. roll......just kinda half assed it and it worked!
Took the mouse for a Sunday morning drive and wished it good luck..........save yourself some time & $ and try this method.

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[snip story of homemade mousetrap]

And that "saves time and money" compared to a spring trap exactly HOW????
A spring trap costs about a dollar, can be used over and over, and takes all of maybe thirty seconds to set, and another thirty seconds to empty.
Compare that to the time, and cost of gasoline, involved in "taking the mouse for a Sunday morning drive" and tell us again how you're saving either time or money with that approach.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says... :) :) The biggest problem (to me) is that :) rats carry many diseases, most unpleasant, :) some fatal. This fact alone may lead :) you to retain a professional exterminator. :) Unfortunately, it is my belief that exterminators :) don't *kill* many rats, but just :) drive them away. My infestation closely :) followed an episode where my neighbor :) had a rat problem and hired an exterminator. :) I think they just moved up the street.
I know of no product in my profession that chases rodents away from one place to another. My guess would be that when one finally hires a pro, the pro will also point out areas on the property that needs addressing to make the area less inviting for a rodent problem. When people actually now spend money to take care of a problems like rats, they are more inclined to follow any advise given to help keep the rats away. If one yard in now less attractant to a rodent population they will migrate to an area more to their liking. :) The traditional approach is poison bait. The most :) common poison is warfarin, which :) is an anticoagulant. Unfortunately, rats :) evolve very quickly, at least metabolically, and :) have become resistant to warfarin. I had :) absolutely no food in my garage, but I found that :) the rats had made their nest in an old box of :) DCON warfarin-based rat poision (?!).
I think the key word with this statement should be "was warafin". I'm in my nineteenth year of pest control and have never seen warafin based products used professionally for the most part, it has always been the second generation anticoagulants and have never heard of any resistance that warafin is known for.
:) A more :) modern poison uses bromethalin, but I am :) afraid rats are adapting to this, also. Bromethalin :) attacks the myelin sheath on the nerves (like polio). :) I never got bromethalin to actually :) kill a rat, but it slows them down so :) that other approaches become more effective. I choose not to use bromethalin products for it is an acute toxin, kills on one feeding, killing the rats too quick, raising the chance of dead ones being found on the attic/crawl space/walls. But when there is a heavy population that is in need of a quick reduction, bromethalin is the way to go.
:) Rats will take the bait back to their nests :) and hoard it, so I would recommend using cubes :) of bait (rather than loose grains) and then :) leave some cubes loose (for rats to take home) Never allow them to be able to carry it away...no assurance that they are not dropping the baits behind the bushes for non target animals to get into :) my ace, which is antifreeze. Rats apparently :) like the smell and the taste. The largest :) rat literally keeled over while drinking antifreeze. :) As do cats and dogs and just a cap full is suppose to be able to cause death to a cat.
--
Lar

to email...get rid of the BUGS
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So, what then *do* you use?
And, are there any good books (or sites) on *how* to do it (get rid of rats, that is)?
(Professionals-to-be have to learn *some* way...)
Thanks,
David
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I use a bait containing Bromadiolone, actually have been using it for a number of years and have no issues with it. I like Bell Labs product called Contrac, mainly because their baits are made with the rat taste in mind. There are other baits containing Bromadiolone, but if the rats don't eat it it won't kill them.
At the moment I can't think of a reference for you...a friends site has some general information, but it also has some info we differ on. http://unexco.com/Rat.html Most of what a professional learns, other than the generic "classroom" type knowledge of "this is a rat 101" comes from being out in the field and constantly being amazed what rats do to survive amongst us.
--
Lar
---- to email get rid of the BUGS!
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This is a juvenile rattus rattus I caught the other day. This is a roof rat, tree rat, fruit rat or "palmetto squirrel" for the chamber of commerce folks. They get about 50% bigger full grown. Our readers should note the identifying long tail. The mesh is 1/2" hardware screen and these guys can eat a hole through it (I have a patch in this trap). Peanut butter with dog food in it did the trick on this one. He now sleeps with the fishes. "Cute" didn't save his ass.
http://members.aol.com/gfretwell/rattusrattus.jpg
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On Fri, 24 Nov 2006 01:32:59 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We have mice. I haven't been able to get rid of them.
Here is a picture of why.
http://i7.tinypic.com/2ex6kah.jpg
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wrote:

LOL!
Bob
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Great picture!
Seriously though - seems like I have roof rats. We hear them scurrying around at night.
If antifreeze is so effective, AND, I have no animals that might get to it, seems like that would be best.
My problem is that if they go back into the roof/rafters, I am concerned about disease as they die up there.
I don't like the idea of traps since the doggone animals are awfully smart - had a bid for an exterminator and it was WAY too expensive.
I liked the 5 gallon bucket idea, but I wasn't clear on how to get them to go into it willingly. I don't have oats, so need another temptation for them, plus, how to rig the bucket???
Help?!?!
Bob F wrote:

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On 25 Nov 2006 17:03:47 -0800, "SquiddlieDiddly"

I did not see the 5 gallon bucket idea but a roof rat can jump about 3 feet straight up so jumping out of a bucket is no big deal
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...

The 5 gal bucket trick is to fill it 3/4 up with water. Place a layer of bird seed (oats) on the water..make a ramp with a board with a light trail of the bird seed up the board...rodent works itself up the ramp then drops down on to the birdseed in the bucket thinking it is solid footing.
--
Lar
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OK cool Better make sure that is a new shiny bucket. If there is any texture on it at all they will just climb out. I am amazed at what the roof rat can climb, I also had one eat a hole in a 30 gallon rubbermaid trash can before I could get my pistol to shoot the little bastard I had the top on it because one had jumped out already. (why I know the three foot jump thing) Rattus rattus is a very common pest here is SW Florida. They eat pretty much everything people plant in their yards and a palm tree is a rat condo. Of course an attic is the Taj Mahal. Once they eat a few holes in the A/C ducts it is air conditioned up there.
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says...

them
Get a cat or two. They did that at the LA Port. I quarantee the rats won't hang around long.
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won't
My neighbor wasn't very happy when her cat brought one home to play with.
Bob
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wrote:

All cats do is kill everything else that is eating the food on the ground like birds, rabbits and squirrels so the only thing there to eat it is the rats and a cat can't eat as fast as a rat can fuck. Rats can also go places a cat can't. A roof rat could live his whole life without ever touching the ground. You show me a neighborhood overrun by cats and I will show you one with a roof rat problem. If you really want to control rats natutrally you want black racers or rat snakes. They have no problem climbing trees and going into the holes where rats live, eating all the babies. They will also take on an adult if it shows up. Cats will kill them too.
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Rats are like any other uninvited guest. When you stop feeding them, they will leave. Actually, that's only half the story. When you remove their food, they are still instinctually bound to stay where they are as much as they can, and they will eat their young as a food source rather than go elsewhere. Because they are generally destined to die unless they can find another site where they won't be 'trespassing'.
In my experience, the presence of dogs, their food, and their feces are an extremely common theme with rat infestations.
David Combs wrote:

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Alright enough of this non-sense. Here is the surest solution.
Load all the rats up on a bus and take it to New Jersey.
Once there the Rats will definately run for office. They will undoubtedly all win....and stay.
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net says...

The majority of the rats I deal with in the Dallas area are roof rats..the common theme I have seen is vertical growing vines. Jasmine, honeysuckle, English ivy. As many rat calls that I can remember either on the property or the adjacent ones will be found the vines allowed to grow upwards on the fence, trees, arbors, even when just on the ground thick up against the house a rat nest usually can be found.
--
Lar
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