getting rid of cat smells

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I just bought a mobile home in which the woman had what smells to be 800 cats. i am ripping out the carpet and of course scrubbing every surface possible. What ,other than Kilz, is an option to insure the smells dont linger? I am also going to have to treat my bedroom floor as the plywood under the carpet has been soaked as well. Any ideas? -------------------------------------
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On 4/11/2011 1:41 PM, quapawgirl wrote:

Move in 800 dogs for a while? :-)
TDD
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quapawgirl wrote:

You should NOT have bought it.
--
All is as it is.

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Mop the floors at least twice with plain water. Do not use bleach. The urea in the floor may react with bleach to form the same gas they formerly used in the gas chambers.
Mop the floors using a product called odor ban about 10 bucks a gallon at Sams Club.
Allow the floors to completely dry. You may have success at this point.
If you still smell it paint the floors with Bins, the shellac based version, $25 a gallon and worth every penny of it. Kiltz is crap and won't do the job. The Bins will do the job.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit http://www.househomerepair.com
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"quapawgirl" wrote in message
I just bought a mobile home in which the woman had what smells to be 800 cats. i am ripping out the carpet and of course scrubbing every surface possible. What ,other than Kilz, is an option to insure the smells dont linger? I am also going to have to treat my bedroom floor as the plywood under the carpet has been soaked as well. Any ideas? -------------------------------------
It can certainly seem like that, even if it was only one animal.
When my father bought his property several years ago, he had to get rid of the Damn Dog reek. Of course the urine-soaked carpet was the first thing to go. The concrete flooring in the hall was scrubbed to death with whatever touted remedy on the market, then "sealed." (hah.) He refinished any wood flooring also, even though it was not so nearly affected. Installed vinyl over the concrete part. Even then still it took two full years before that damned smell was completely gone.
I am.. sorry to say none of my menfolk ever had experience with trailers, however I do say this with confidence: Do your damnedest, but above all, have patience. It *will* subside.
Eventually.
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quapawgirl wrote the following:

Gasoline and a match.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

It's the only guaranteed method.
--
All is as it is.

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On 4/11/2011 5:48 PM, LSMFT wrote:

Y'all beat me to it. Basically, you have to treat it like a fire cleanup- kilz or urethane to encapsulate everything you can, run an ozone generator for a week, and live knowing that every time the humidity spikes in warm weather, some of the scent will be back.
Not that I would ever buy a mobile- I'd rather live in a beehive apartment in town- but one that smelled like cats would be an instant walkaway for me when shopping.
--
aem sends...

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wrote:

That wont work, no one can afford the gasoline anymore !!!!
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Worse case scenario, you have to rip out the floor plywood and all the wall coverings (drywall, paneling, etc.) 4 foot up all the walls. Treat with an enzymatic odor removers and then replace.

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ksfoodjunkie_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (quapawgirl) wrote in

Hire a company that removes bad smells. Seen them advertised for removing fire and smoke smells. It may be worth it for the first time cleaning.
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On 4/11/2011 7:42 PM, RobertPatrick wrote:

Somehow I don't think that is in OP's budget, given what she purchased....
--
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quapawgirl wrote:

Go visit the pet store. They will have stuff. I had apartments for a while. Don't remember the name, but it got the cat smell out of carpet.
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On 4/11/2011 1:41 PM, quapawgirl wrote:

be advised, the kilz works just fine if you use the original oil based product. polyurethane works better if you're just sealing wood to cover with something else.
--
Steve Barker
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On Mon, 11 Apr 2011 18:41:02 +0000, ksfoodjunkie_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (quapawgirl) wrote:

Find a big fat woman opera singer. It's almost guaranteed she'll have so much of that "old lady" perfume on herself that she'll cover the odor. Just let her live there, but tell her she MUST buy her own food, because you wont be able to afford the food for her to stay fat.
If her opera singing bothers you, duct tape works well over the mouth. If all else fails, put carpeting on top of her and staple it down well.
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quapawgirl wrote:

Ozone generator. Used by smoke remediation folks and those who need to remove the smells of dead things and very dead things.
Don't get a piddly-assed one - get one that produces several thousand millgrams of Ozone per hour (3,000 is a respectable number).
Ozone will kill smells, bacteria, viruses, mold, mildew, pets, humans, and toads given sufficient concentration. A one-hour treatment of an average-sized room should be sufficient.
Maybe you can even rent one?
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"Are Ozone Generators Effective in Controlling Indoor Air Pollution?
Available scientific evidence shows that at concentrations that do not exceed public health standards, ozone has little potential to remove indoor air contaminants."
http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/ozonegen.html
nb
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Smitty Two wrote:

You need not "air out" the area. Ozone decomposes into plain oxygen in about an hour. That quality makes it easier to decontaminate areas that are difficult to ventilate: root cellars, locker rooms, bottomless pits, etc.
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I rented an apt with dog urine stench from a former 2-dog occupant that was unbearable in the Summer. The landlord replaced the entire front room carpet and that was enough, despite the stains on the underlying plywood.
Later, a friend's dog dumped a 2 ft dia pool of runny dog shit on the new carpet. I was furious! Fortunately, organic odor removers are readily available at any pet store (pricey). It literally eats the stink over 48 hrs and worked brilliantly, eliminating all smell and stain. I was amazed. I have no experience on how these deodorizers would work on old stains.
Between the two options, hope this helps.
nb
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notbob wrote:

Most pet odor elminators work through enzymatic action. As long as the enzyme solution can encounter the offending material within an aqueous solution, the enzymes will be able to break down the molecules which cause the offending odor(s).
The main problem with old stains is that they penetrate the subsurface to a degree which requires a liberal application of the enzyme solution over a period of time to ensure penetration. Most people tend use them as a surface spray, without realizing that you really need to soak the stuff in there, thoroughly saturating the affected area, for it to work. If you don't do it right the first time, the odor will keep coming back, no matter how many little spritzes you spray in the general area.
Jon
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