getting rid of bees

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I have some big bees starting to build a hive, nest, or whatever in the eaves of my house. Is there a way to discourage this activity or should I just spray it and kill them off?
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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On 8/10/2013 6:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Sometimes depends on the bee. I knock paper wasp nests down when first started and wasps do not bother me.
Yellow jackets on the other hand will attack and sting and are best treated with wasp spray.
If building the hive inside the wall, you need to spray and seal.
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As for me, I figure there's enough trees and such out there, for them to nest. I kill em off, without a second thought. Don't need boring, drilling, nesting, and all that on my structure.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/10/2013 6:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Hi, Bees are territorial. If there is hive nearby too close they won't stay there. HD sells fake hive you can hang up. Try it and hope they will move. Or spray with Raid in the evening when they are all in bed....
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

Spectracide Pro (white/black/red can), not the regular Spectracide (green can). With pro they will hit the ground instantly, with the other they will get mad and chase you.
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wrote:

If they are BEES call an apiary and they will relocate the hive. If they are wasps, yellowjackets, hornets, etc, ZAP EM!!!
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On 8/10/2013 6:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

contact a local bee keeper.
they will smoke them and remove them.
--
Jeff

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On 8/10/2013 6:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

If they are real bees, don't kill.. I have a few friends that are bee keepers. Mites have been killing off bee populations, we need bees..
Contact a bee keeper in the area, they will gladly take them.
--
Jeff

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On 8/10/2013 5:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Someone already beat me to it about contacting a beekeeper. There has been a lot of news about the loss of bees which are important for pollinating crops so I'm guessing a beekeeper would be glad to adopt your bees. ^_^
TDD
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On Sat, 10 Aug 2013 23:19:35 -0500, The Daring Dufas

You really need a better ID before you do anything. A lot of people call anything with a stringer, and some things without a "bee".
Paper wasps and dirt daubers are not particularly aggressive, the hornets and yellow jackets are more so and africanized honey bees can really hurt you.
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On 8/11/2013 12:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Digital camera pictures Emailed to a beekeeper would be a good start to make sure you don't waste someone's time. My Kodak digital is quite good at getting closeup shots of anything, including insects. ^_^
TDD
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Look for rap music, pants on the ground, and packing a nine, know I'm sayin, bro?
Of course, carpenter bees and honey bees and killer wasps, all require different answers.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 8/11/2013 1:30 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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On 8/10/2013 6:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

Open eaves? Not as dire a problem as in enclosed eaves, IMO. Please don't start throwing poison at the until you know what they are....not likely they are honey bees, but they should not be killed if possible. Beekeepers might be found to come and remove them if they are honey bees. Hornets and yellow jackets are a whole nother thing.
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As long as you've been on Usenet, Kurt, I can't believe you've never seen this story that I posted a number of years ago:
https://groups.google.com/forum /#!msg/misc.rural/p-l2O1bvWLI/P0d1cVAcFpUJ
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Big bees in the eaves sound like carpenter bees.
I agree, identification is critical here.
If they are carpenter bees you need to get rid of them. They are as bad as termites at gnawing into your wood. Spray poison at night.
If they are wasps you may be able to coexist. That's what we do. We don't bother them and they don't bother us.
Yellowjackets, different story. Kill on sight. Soapy water spray when we see them, 5 gallon pail of soapy water into the nest at night (here they nest in the ground).
Honey bees? I've found no beekeeper will take them, too much risk of adding a colony disease to their hives. If they nest in the house we spray.
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Seeing it is one thing... remember it is another thing all together (grin). Besides you are talking about bumble bees, these are just honey bees... different thing entirely which is why I never made the connection (yeah, that's the ticket). '
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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They're just as susceptible to Sevin as bumblebees, maybe even more so.
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On Monday, August 12, 2013 2:20:26 PM UTC-7, Doug Miller wrote:

the

uld

een

pUJ


I hate to see you kill off valuable honey bees. We have too few of them le ft.
We let a friend put his hives in our yard years ago. Some imelater, they sw armed. Amazing sight! My plum tree was wrapped in layers of bees, clingin g to each other. Very peaceful. After a while, I assume the Queen gave th e signal, because they all moved out to their next place of residence.
Not knowing your situation, is there any way you could hang in there until they swarm?
HB
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Doug Miller wrote:

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumblebee
"Bumblebees are in danger in many developed countries due to habitat destruction and collateral pesticide damage. In Britain, until relatively recently, 19 species of native true bumblebee were recognised along with six species of cuckoo bumblebees. Of these, three have been extirpated (me-exterminated),[32][33] eight are in serious decline, and only six remain widespread.[34] Similar declines in bumblebees have been reported in Ireland, with 4 species being designated endangered, and another two species considered vulnerable to extinction.[35] A decline in bumblebee numbers could cause large-scale changes to the countryside, resulting from inadequate pollination of certain plants. The world's first bumblebee sanctuary was established at Vane Farm in the Loch Leven National Nature Reserve in Scotland in 2008.[36]
Some bumblebees native to North America are also vanishing, such as Bombus terricola, Bombus affinis and Bombus occidentalis, with one, Bombus franklini, that may even be extinct.[37]
In 2011, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature set up the Bumblebee Specialist Group to review the threat status of all bumblebee species worldwide using the IUCN Red List criteria.[38] Misconceptions".
The cure for a problem with every living thing is not to kill it, unless it knows better.
Find the entry port and close it. Wait until winter. Remove the vacant hive, and spray the stub with insecticide so they won't reuse it to build another hive next year.
--
Bill (champion of all living things)
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 8/10/2013 6:48 PM, Kurt Ullman wrote:

We have a big tractor tire, used as sandbox by prev. owners' kids, which I converted to strawberry bed this spring. Lots of nice berries but I haven't bothered much with them, other than to mulch, feed and occ. water. Busy with other garden/pond stuff! In the past two days, the strawberry bed has been swarmed with dang yellow jackets....don't see them anywhere else and they don't seem to be doing anything other than buzzing around the strawberry plants and lighting occasionally. Haven't seen them anywhere else, and I sure don't want to run into their nest. I'll be out with the Sevin dust this evening :o)
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