GE R.O. Water Filter

I installed 3 of the subject GE reverse osmosis water filters about a year ago. (The model number is PXRQ15RBL). My daughter wanted one (because she didn't like Los Angeles city water), so I stalled one at her place. I liked the way it installed easily, so when I returned to my Ohio well water, I installed an identical model here. Our well water wasn't bad. There was an occassional slight sulfer odor, but testing indicated no harmful bacteria. It is also softened.) The filter seemed to work well, but I found myself also drinking water from a bar sink in the basement family room. This seemed silly since I had installed the filter upstairs - so I bought another filter and installed it at the basement bar sink. That's it for background - now to my question:
The manual says to replace the "pre" and "post" filter canisters every 6 months. To make the product seem high tech, they even provide a 6 month timer that lights an LED when the 6 months is up. That is all it is - a timer. It does not measure usage, flow rate, or contaminates at all. So, how often do I really need to change the canisters? The filter installed upstairs is used for making coffee, tea, and meals every day, while the filter at the bar sink is used for only a few ounces of water no more often than once a week.
I can't imagine why both units need to have their filters changed at the same time. Do the filters get clogged? (Mine haven't even on the higher use sink). Do the filters become contaminated with bacteria? In that case, the lower use one might be worse. (In my case, there have been no foul odors nor reduced flow). Both LED indicators went on at 6 months and blinked until the batteries died. I just can't see spending $80 every 6 months for no reason. Does anyone have any inside information or real experience regarding these things? How can I tell when they really need to be changed? Am I being reasonably frugal or risking my life?
Pat
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Thanks Oren, I hadn't seen that 900 gallon figure before. So, should I change them after 900 gallons or is it "6 months or 900 gallons whichever comes first"?
The kitchen one will reach 900 gallons in about 2-1/2 years (at about a gallon per day). However, the basement unit won't use 900 gallons until the year 2089 since I doubt I use a gallon per month down there.
By the way, I just checked on filter prices. The local Home Depot has them for $45.99 per pair (the "pre" and "post" filter). Since I have 2 units, That would be $92 every six months if I chose to follow the blinking LED's advice. Plus, when changing filters, the sanitizing procedure must be followed. They stress how easy it is to change filters without any tools (which is true), but the sanitizing procedure takes hours. I think I will change filters every couple of years unless I notice the water flow slowing down or any odors.
Pat
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On 12/16/2014 8:58 AM, Pat wrote:

with a particle filter, then a carbon filter. The particle filter is paper and will disintegrate after about a year. The particle filter was plumbed backwards by the previous owner, so when the paper disintegrated it plugged the screens on the washing machine cold water line.
If your filters have any paper in the filter, that will be the reason for more frequent filter changes.
Paul
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Why not just review the water usage log that every member of the family has to update whenever they fill a glass (graduated beaker, of course) with RO water?
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