GE Microwave

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I have a GE microwave that is about 15 years old. Just last week it started making a clunking sound as the turntable started. It appears to be skipping as the turntable stops very briefly, then starts up again, then repeats and repeats.
Does this sound like a common problem that is fixable? I havent taken it apart: if it is plastic gears (i.e. stripped) is it likely to be something I could repair in a DIY workshop?
Thx, P
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On 2/15/2013 3:31 PM, Puddin' Man wrote:

Re-seat the glass tray in it's groves and you will be ok
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On 2/15/2013 4:17 PM, Chuck wrote:

I second this response...
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s

it

And if it's not, unless it's a built-in, it's not worth wasting much time and money fooling around with when you can get a new one for $100 that's going to be a whole lot nicer.
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First (and second etc)thing I tried. Makes no difference.
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2013 14:31:17 -0600, Puddin' Man

Two potential problems with fixing it. Parts no longer available, parts costing more than new unit.
Probably something simple in the drive, maybe a gear. Never look to see how they work. Try www.repairclinic.com for ideas
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2013 14:31:17 -0600, Puddin' Man

I have a built in about the same age and I think it works fine. I say I think because the wife seems to have problems with it that I have yet to encounter. So I don't know if it's her or the microwave. I'm contemplating a new one soon regardless because I think if you get 15 to 20 years, that's about as good as you will get.
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On 2/16/2013 12:00 AM, Doug wrote:

Yes, but which one are you referring to?
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On 2/16/2013 10:09 AM, bud-- wrote:

Both can be bad for your health after a certain number of years...
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Actually when mine were both new, the microwave was a lot easy to adjust to <g>.
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wrote:

Excellent question.... my wife even got a kick out of it. Let me have some more time to answer the question and I'll get back to you <g>.
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On 2/15/2013 2:31 PM, Puddin' Man wrote:

I've not ever seen one of these that has any type of gears for the turntable. There is a small motor that you access through the bottom center. You will have to snip the metal tabs around the plate to access if no one has ever been there before - metal plate will be held with a screw. Check on the cost of the motor, it should be under $20. They all look alike, so if you see a microwave at curb side, don't hesitate to rob its motor.
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On 2/15/2013 3:31 PM, Puddin' Man wrote:

If you decide to buy a new micro, consider the Panasonic Inverter models or the Whirlpool Accuwave Power System models.
http://shop.panasonic.com/shop/microwave-ovens-countertop-microwaves
http://www.whirlpool.com /-[WMH75520AW]-1021232/WMH75520AW/
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On Sat, 16 Feb 2013 10:33:35 -0500, Alton Browne
Neither of those are equipped with probes for cooking by temperature of the food.
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wrote:

Does anyone actually use those? Does anyone actually use microwave ovens for cooking?
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On Feb 17, 5:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@attt.bizz wrote:

I haven't and it would not be on my list of features. How is a probe even possible in most microwave ovens today? They typically have rotating bases and wouldn't the cord from the probe get tangled up?
I agree with the microwave oven use. I use mine a lot, for heating a cup of water, warming the cat food, thawing frozen food, warming food, etc. But never use it for cooking.
If you watch the food reality shows like Kitchen Nightmares on TV, the worst most screwed up restaurants are the ones using microwaves. Even there, I've only seen them using it to heat, not to actually cook.
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On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 05:49:54 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

We had one on a MW from some 20+ years ago. Instead of a rotating table, it had a reflective fan under the bottom that acted the same way. The probe was handy for a few uses to see the temperature or even to set it to shut off at a predetermined temperature. They are more expensive to build though and few people use them.
Microwave cooking can be done very well if you use the proper techniques. I'd say 98% of the owners have no idea how to use one properly, what different power settings are for, importance of waiting time, etc.
The biggest downside is you get no crust in a MW. Aside from that, you actually can cook a beef roast to the doneness you desire and a more rare interior, just like a regular oven. You have to get past the no outer crustiness though.
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And eating a gray piece of meat. A lot of the flavor, probably most of it, comes from the searing that you get with a conventional method.
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On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 06:11:55 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

No, my point is, you don't have to eat gray meat. The major difference is you don't get the outside sear but you do get the inside flavor and gradient of doneness. I've done it.
When we bought our first mw some years ago, the store offered a three class program. Appetizers, entree, desserts. They demonstrated what can be done and how to do it. We cooked real food and ate it at the end of each class. The beef roast was very good, not gray.
There is more to it that just setting the time on high power for everything.
From your comment, I'll have to put you in the 98% category I mentioned.
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On 2/18/2013 9:54 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I do baked potatoes and corn on the cob often. Works for me.
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